Login

ABC Cost & Inventory Analysis: Examples

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: Standard Cost Accounting System: Benefits & Limitations

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:00 Introduction to ABC Analysis
  • 1:30 Examples of Use
  • 3:40 Benefits of ABC…
  • 4:40 Lesson Summary
Add to Add to Add to

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Login or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Create an account to start this course today
Try it free for 5 days!
Create An Account

Recommended Lessons and Courses for You

Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Brianna Whiting
In this lesson, we will explore ABC cost and inventory analysis. We will define it, look at some examples, and explain why a company may use this type of system. The lesson will conclude with a summary and quiz.

Introduction to ABC Analysis

Meet Tina! Tina is the manager for So Soft Sweaters. Part of her job is taking care of all of the inventory the store has. She orders it, stores it, organizes it, and keeps a total of what is in stock and what has low inventory. Basically, anything that is inventory related, Tina takes care of it.

While she has always been good at her job, lately she has become a bit overwhelmed. You see, the store has recently started to carry many more styles of sweaters, which has made Tina's job a bit more challenging. Instead of having to only organize and keep track of 50 types of sweaters, she now has 185 types. Tina realizes that she needs a better system of organizing and analyzing the inventory the store has. After much research, she decides to utilize the ABC inventory analysis.

The great thing about this type of inventory analysis, is that the name helps explain and define it. The ABC stands for activity based costing, and ABC inventory analysis is a way for a company to categorize inventory based on importance. It is also a way for a company to understand overhead and direct expenses based on the most important activities of the business and then categorize them based on that importance. Finally, the ABC inventory analysis allows a company to better visualize those areas within the company that generate the most profit.

Examples of ABC Inventory Analysis Use

Because the ABC inventory analysis can be used several ways, let's look at a few examples to show how this type of system can be beneficial for a company.

If we take Tina and her sweater store from earlier, we know that she has many types of sweaters to inventory but seems to need a better system to organize and keep track of everything. Utilizing the ABC inventory analysis, Tina might organize her data the following way:

Category A- The sweaters that fall within this category are the most important sweaters in the company. For instance, they may be the sweaters that are the highest in demand and the hottest trend for the season.

Category B- These sweaters are important to the company but do not possess as high of a priority. Perhaps there is a smaller market for these sweaters, and therefore, they do not sell as well or as quickly as those in category A. An example may be Christmas sweaters. While they are important around the Christmas holiday, after Christmas, they do not sell as well as those sweaters that are in category A.

Category C- This is the last category of inventory. Those sweaters that do not fall within category A or B, fall within category C. They are the least important of all sweaters and do not have as high of a value to the company. These do not have a high priority and probably do not sell very well year-round. Some sweaters that may fall within this category are those sweaters that may be an odd size, or color.

Another way that Tina can categorize her inventory using the ABC method, is by revenue. For example:

Category A sweaters bring in the most revenue for the company. They account for 80% of all revenue. These sweaters sell fast and easy and are in high demand.

Category B sweaters account for 15% of revenue. These sell better than sweaters in category C but do not sell as well as those in category A. They only bring in a small portion of sales for the company.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register for a free trial

Are you a student or a teacher?
I am a teacher
What is your educational goal?
 Back

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 10 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 95 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 2,000 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it free for 5 days!
Create An Account
Support