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Buying Situations: Types & Concept

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  • 0:01 Buying Situations
  • 0:20 Buying Types
  • 2:05 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Shawn Grimsley
Buyers face different buying situations every day. In this lesson, you'll learn about different buying situations and related concepts. You'll also have a chance to take a short quiz after the lesson to reinforce your knowledge.

Situations and Types

A buying situation relates to the circumstances surrounding a purchase that can be defined by the quality of information and experience that the buyer has concerning the products and vendors available, as well as the effort it will take to make the purchase decision.

There are three primary buying situations. Let's take a look at each of them in some detail.

Straight Rebuy
This is the probably the easiest buying situation for a purchaser. In this situation, you are engaging in the routine purchase of standard products from a familiar supplier where you don't make any modifications from the most recent order. A perfect example is ordering some boxes of copier paper, pens, and pencils from your office supplier. It doesn't take much effort except to confirm the sales order has been satisfied.

Modified Rebuy
This is a situation where the purchaser is going to buy a similar product, but there is a significant difference in the purchase from the previous purchase. The difference may include a change in the product specifications or a new supplier. An example may be switching to a different type of software provided by a different vendor. This buying situation involves more effort because you are going to have to research product specifications and evaluate vendors, as well as possibly negotiate new contracts.

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