Login

Heart Rate, Cardiac Output & Stroke Volume

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: Regulation of Heart Rate and Stroke Volume

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:31 Cardiac Output
  • 1:51 Heart Rate and Stroke Volume
  • 3:27 Clinical Importance
  • 3:57 Lesson Summary
Add to Add to Add to

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Login or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Create an account to start this course today
Try it free for 5 days!
Create An Account

Recommended Lessons and Courses for You

Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Rebecca Gillaspy

Dr. Gillaspy has taught health science at University of Phoenix and Ashford University and has a degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic.

The amount of blood your heart pumps is constantly changing to meet the needs of your body. In this lesson, you will learn how the heart maintains an adequate cardiac output, heart rate and stroke volume.

Circulatory System

There's a lot riding on the proper amount of blood being pumped by your heart with each heartbeat. A good, strong heart allows the proper amount of blood to flow through your body, which carries gases to your lungs and body tissues where they can be exchanged. It also delivers nutrients to the trillions of cells in your body and carries away cell waste. In this lesson, we will look at just how we calculate the amount of blood being pumped by your heart.

Cardiac Output

Cardiac output (CO) is the term used to show the amount of blood pumped per minute by each ventricle. When your body's at rest, your heart beats about 75 times per minute. Each time it pumps, it pushes out about 75 milliliters of blood, which is about a third of a cup - it's about the amount that you could hold in your cupped hand. When you multiply the number of heartbeats per minute times the amount of blood being pumped during each heartbeat, you get the cardiac output.

The average cardiac output of humans is 5.6 liters of blood per minute.
Cardiac Output

If we do the math using the examples above, we see that 75 heartbeats per minute times 75 milliliters of blood pumped during each heartbeat equals the average cardiac output of about 5.6 liters of blood pumped through your heart each minute. That's a lot of blood, and if you consider that large bottles of soda often come in 2 liter containers, that means that your heart pumps the contents of more than 2 and a half of these soda bottles every minute.

It's also interesting to consider that the total amount of blood in your body is usually between 5 and 6 liters; this means that your heart pumps the entire blood supply every minute. We've said it before, but it's true to say it again: the heart is quite a workaholic!

Heart Rate and Stroke Volume

What we have from the example just described is a formula for figuring out the amount of blood pumped per minute by each ventricle, what we call the cardiac output. So, let's look at this formula a little bit closer. Cardiac output equals the number of heartbeats per minute times the volume of blood pumped out of the ventricles with each heartbeat. When we look at this equation in cardiovascular physiology, we use the terms heart rate (HR) to describe the number of heartbeats per minute and stroke volume (SV) to describe the volume of blood pumped by the ventricles with each heartbeat. Therefore, our equation looks like this: CO = HR x SV.

We know that if you increase the amount of blood being pumped by your heart every minute, what you're really doing is increasing your cardiac output. And, from our equation, we see that this means you either increased your heart rate or your stroke volume or both. Think of it this way: if you want to use buckets to fill up a kiddie pool for a child who wants to play in the water and that child is growing impatient, you'll want to fill the pool faster to increase the amount of water getting into the pool.

In other words, you want to increase your water output. You can do this in a few ways: you can either move faster, filling more buckets per minute, which is an increased rate, or you could increase the size of the bucket, which is an increased volume. Or, you could do both! The same goes for the heart. If your body demands more blood, due to something such as exercise, your heart will beat faster and beat stronger.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register for a free trial

Are you a student or a teacher?
I am a teacher
What is your educational goal?
 Back

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 10 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 95 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 2,000 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it free for 5 days!
Create An Account
Support