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How to Calculate Asset Turnover Ratio: Formula & Example

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  • 0:00 Asset Turnover Ratio Defined
  • 0:30 Formula
  • 3:10 Interpreting Asset…
  • 4:32 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Tina Van Rikxoord
The asset turnover ratio is one of the items that companies and potential stockholders look at in order to figure out how well a company's money is working for it. In this lesson, we will learn how to calculate a company's asset turnover ratio.

Asset Turnover Ratio Defined

Every business has assets, or things that the company owns and uses in its business in order to make money. These assets can include not just tangible items like cash, supplies, buildings, and equipment, but also intangible assets like trademarks and copyrights. The asset turnover ratio is a number that shows how much revenue is being earned for every dollar the company has spent on assets. It represents how well a company uses its assets to make money.

Formula

The formula for figuring the asset turnover ratio is:

ATR Formula

To see how to use this formula, let's look at the example of a company that makes jewelry. We'll call it Linda's Jewelry, and Linda is the owner. To make her jewelry Linda needs tools like beads, wire, string, glue, and work tables. She will also need computers and software to keep track of sales, inventory, and other administrative items. All of these items are considered to be assets.

Let's say the company just started in 2013 and had $16,100 worth of total assets in its first year. Since the company has only been in business for one year, we can use the total assets listed on the balance sheet as the average total assets.

Figure 1. Sample balance sheet for first year.
Balance Sheet ATR 1yr

Average Total Assets for 2013 = $16,100

If the company has been in operation for at least two years, you will need to calculate the average of the total assets for the past two years. Let's say that in its second year of operation, Linda's Jewelry had $20,000 in assets.

Figure 2. Sample balance sheet for the first and second years
Balance Sheet ATR 2yr

To calculate the average total assets, add the total assets for the current year to the total assets for the previous year,and divide by two.

Average Total Assets for 2014 = (Assets for 2014 + Assets for 2013) / 2

Average Total Assets for 2014 = ($20,000 + $16,100) / 2

Average Total Assets for 2014 = $18,050

Now that we have figured out the average total assets, we can use it in the formula.

The second piece of information that we need for the formula is the company's net revenue, which is the sales revenue after deducting various expenses. Net revenue is taken directly from the income statement. The net revenue used in the formula is generally called total revenue on the income statement. Let's say that in its first year Linda's Jewelry earns $35,000 in net revenue. In the second year, Linda's Jewelry earns $65,000 in net revenue.

Figure 3. Sample Income Statement
income statement

Now, let's say Linda wants to understand how well the assets the company has purchased are contributing to creating that income. She would calculate the company's asset turnover ratio to find out. So, for Linda's Jewelry:

Asset Turnover Ratio for 2013 = $35,000 / $16,100

Asset Turnover Ratio for 2013 = 2.14

Asset Turnover Ratio for 2014 = $65,000 / $18,050

Asset Turnover Ratio for 2014 = 3.60

Interpreting Asset Turnover Ratio

The asset turnover ratio of a company is a good way to gauge how a company's assets are contributing to or detracting from its revenue. Generally, the higher the asset turnover ratio the better the company is using its assets; however, exactly what ratio is considered good depends upon the industry. You wouldn't compare a jewelry company's asset turnover ratio to that of a car rental company!

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