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Managerial Control: Definition, Techniques & Types

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  • 0:00 Definition of…
  • 0:16 Techniques &Types of Control
  • 2:18 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Shawn Grimsley
In this lesson, you will learn about the concept of managerial control, what it is, its types and its techniques. You'll also have an opportunity to reinforce your knowledge with a short quiz after the lesson.

Definition of Managerial Control

Managerial control is one of the primary functions of management, and it involves setting performance standards, measuring performance and taking corrective actions when necessary.

Techniques and Types of Control

Scholars have broken managerial control down into six different approaches for control and coordination of organizational work activities.

Mutual Adjustment

In this approach, workers help each other on what needs to be done and how it should be done. Coordination and control is left in the hands of those that perform the work.

Direct Supervision

A person is assigned to supervise a group of workers, and a formal hierarchy is established. The supervisor issues orders and directions, monitors work performance and makes adjustments as necessary.

Standardization of Work Process

This approach relies on the development of rules and operating procedures that govern how each work task is performed. Control is accomplished by severely limiting a worker's discretion to deviate from the rules and operating procedures.

Standardization of Outputs

In this approach, workers are given product specifications or performance goals to which they must adhere. Unlike standardization of work process, workers are given a wide degree of discretion in accomplishing the work task, so long as the end product or performance meets the specification and goals. The organization maintains control by monitoring and assessing outputs against the specification and goals. If there is a discrepancy between the outputs and specification, corrective action is taken.

Standardization of Work Skills

This approach involves hiring workers who already possess the necessary knowledge and skills to perform the work tasks and make the appropriate decisions regarding the tasks. The organization relies on educational and professional organizations to provide standard training. These types of workers are generally self-controlling - doctors and lawyers are prime examples.

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