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Object Pronoun: Definition & Examples

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  • 0:00 Definition of Object Pronoun
  • 0:15 Identifying Objects
  • 1:15 Object Pronouns in Action
  • 1:50 Choosing the Right Pronoun
  • 2:55 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Debbie Notari
Object pronouns are pronouns that serve as objects in sentences. In this lesson, we will see how to identify object pronouns and how to use them correctly in sentences.

The Definition of Object Pronoun

Object pronouns are pronouns that act as objects in sentences. We use them in spoken English on a regular basis. Because they act as objects, they receive the action of the subject in the sentence. Here is a list of commonly used object pronouns:

  • You
  • Them
  • Us
  • Me
  • Her
  • Him
  • It
  • Whom

Identifying Objects

You might be asking how objects work in sentences, so it would be a good idea to review their roles. Objects receive the action of the subject in the sentence, either directly, which we call direct objects, or indirectly, which we call indirect objects. When we're trying to find the indirect object, we ask the question to who, or to whom? Here are a few examples:

1. 'John hit the ball to Mary.'

In this sentence, the word 'ball' is the direct object. It receives the action of the subject, 'John.' The word 'Mary' is the indirect object because John hits the ball to Mary. This sentence could also read, 'John hit Mary the ball.'

2. 'The dog ate my sister's homework.'

The word 'homework' acts as a direct object in this sentence. It directly receives the action of the dog. There is no indirect object in this sentence.

Object Pronouns in Action

Now, we can use pronouns as objects and indirect objects. Here are a few examples to show how this works in a sentence.

1. 'Camille sang them for grandma.'

In this sentence, the word 'them' serves as an object pronoun because it receives the action of Camille's singing. We assume the 'them' to mean songs.

2. 'Pamela gave it to her.'

This sentence contains both a direct object, 'it,' and an indirect object 'her,' and both of these words are object pronouns.

Choosing the Right Pronoun

Object pronouns can be tricky. Sometimes, we choose the wrong pronoun. Take these sentences, for example:

  1. 'Jan made tacos for she and him.'
  2. 'Homework is easy for Sam and I.'
  3. 'Jorge accidentally kicked they in the shins.'

Well, the first and third sentences don't sound right, do they? The way to test and see if you have chosen the correct pronoun is to separate them. First, say, 'Jan made tacos for him.' That works. Then try, 'Jan made tacos for she.' Now, that is not right. We need to say, 'Jan made tacos for her.' The third sentence is fairly obvious. We would definitely want to replace the word 'they' with 'them.'

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