Copyright

Somatoform Disorders: Definition and Perspectives

  • 0:05 Somatoform Disorders
  • 2:39 Historical Views
  • 4:52 Somatic Symptom Disorder
  • 6:21 Lesson Summary
Create An Account
To Start This Course Today
Used by over 10 million students worldwide
Create An Account
Try it free for 5 days
Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Natalie Boyd

Natalie is a teacher and holds an MA in English Education and is in progress on her PhD in psychology.

What happens when psychological pain becomes physical pain? In this lesson, we'll look at the category of mental illness known as somatoform disorders, including the history and current views on them.

Somatoform Disorders

Alice's doctor is stumped. For a while now, she has been in to see the doctor regularly with symptoms of illness, like pain in her abdomen and paralysis in her right leg. Her doctor knows that Alice is not faking these symptoms, but he can't find anything wrong with her. He just doesn't know what the problem could be.

Alice might be suffering from a somatoform disorder. Somatoform disorders are psychological disorders that involve experiencing physical symptoms without a physical illness. No one is exactly sure what causes somatoform disorders, though it's clear that psychological stress has some impact on the patients.

Psychologists use a book called the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM for short, in order to diagnose patients like Alice. The most popular version of the DSM is the DSM-IV-TR, which was published in 2000.

In that version, there are seven disorders that fall under the umbrella of somatoform disorders:

  1. Conversion disorder involves having something specifically wrong with you without any physical illness. For example, someone might become blind, even though their eyes and their brain are fine.
  2. Somatization disorder is similar to conversion disorder, but the symptoms are more general and might involve several areas of the body.
  3. Pain disorder is just what it sounds like: chronic pain that's brought on by or exacerbated by psychological issues.
  4. Hypochondriasis involves reacting to minor physical issues as though they were life threatening. For example, a patient might believe that a normal headache is actually a brain tumor.
  5. Body dysmorphic disorder is when an imagined flaw in a person's physical appearance gives them psychological distress. For example, a patient might become convinced that their nose is too large, even though it is a normal size.
  6. Undifferentiated somatoform disorder is kind of like conversion disorder and somatization disorder, but occurs when a patient has only one symptom in the past six months.
  7. Somatoform disorder not otherwise specified is a general diagnosis given when a person has physical symptoms without physical illness but does not fit the criteria for one of the other somatoform disorders.

Historical Views

Somatoform disorders have been around for most of history. The ancient Egyptians reported cases of somatoform disorders, as did the ancient Greeks, Romans and most modern societies. The history of somatoform disorders makes it clear that they have been around a long time, but the way they have been viewed has changed with the times.

No one knows why, but somatoform disorders are more common in women than in men. In ancient Egypt, perhaps because men were seen as unmanly if they reported physical symptoms, it was believed that somatoform disorders only happened in women. Egyptian doctors suggested that perhaps the problem was that the womb had detached and was floating around inside the body. Wherever the symptoms showed up, the Egyptians believed, that was where the wandering womb was.

Remember Alice? Among other symptoms, she has experienced paralysis in her right leg. According to the ancient Egyptians, her womb would have traveled down to her leg and was causing problems there. If she then experiences pain in her chest, it would be because her womb had traveled up to her chest.

The ancient Greeks gave somatoform disorders the name hysteria, which stuck with the disorders for thousands of years. The word hysteria came from the Greek word for uterus and reflected the Greek agreement with the Egyptians that a wandering womb was responsible for somatoform symptoms.

In the 19th century, Sigmund Freud finally gave hysteria a new name. He called it conversion disorder, because he believed that it was caused by converting psychological pain into physical pain. Freud and his colleagues still believed that conversion disorder was just a female problem, though.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 10 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 100 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 2,900 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

You now have full access to our lessons and courses, watch the lesson now or keep exploring.
You've watched a video! Now you are officially smarter, check out the next video or take the quiz to keep learning.
You took a quiz! Getting a perfect score on a quiz is how you gain course progress. If you aced it, great job! If not, don't worry, you can try again.
You now have full access to our lessons and courses, watch the lesson now or keep exploring.
You just finished your first lesson. Study.com has thousands of lessons to help you meet your educational goals.
You're making great progress. Aim to watch at least 30 minutes of lessons each day and you'll master this before you know it!
You've learned so much, but only scratched the surface. Wait until you see what we have in your next lesson!
Getting a perfect score on a quiz is how you gain course progress. If you aced it, great job! If not, don’t worry, you can try again.
You're getting the hang of this! Keep taking quizzes to make progress on your learning goals.
Look how far you've come! Take all the quizzes in a chapter and you'll master this topic in no time.
Keep clicking that 'next lesson' button whenever you finish a lesson and its quiz.
You're 25% of the way through this course! Keep going at this rate and you'll be done before you know it.
Two days in a row, nice! Keep your streak going to get the most of your learning and reach your goal faster.