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Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium III: Evolutionary Agents

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question 1 of 3

Consider a population where the number of dorsal spines on a fish is determined by a single gene, which is defined by two different alleles. The dominant A allele encodes a long spine and the recessive a allele encodes a short spine. The fish is diploid and reproduces sexually. If the number of AA individuals is 500, the number of Aa individuals is 200, and the number of aa individuals is 300, what is the chance that I catch a fish with long spines in this population?

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1.

Consider a population where the number of dorsal spines on a fish is determined by a single gene, which is defined by two different alleles. The dominant A allele encodes a long spine and recessive a allele encodes a short spine. The fish is diploid and reproduces sexually. If the number of AA individuals is 500, the number of Aa individuals is 100, and the number of aa individuals is 400, which of the following statements are true:

I. The population is in equilibrium.

II. The population is not in equilibrium.

III. The observed number of fish with short spines exceeds the expected.

IV. The expected number of AA individuals exceeds the number of observed.

2.

After observing a population of fish with interesting protective spines, a scientist decides to move two of the fish into a new pond to create a new population of fish to study the ability of the fish to survive a new set of predators. Which of the following evolutionary agents did the scientist introduce?

I. Natural selection

II. Founder effect

III. Mutation

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About This Quiz & Worksheet

This assessment pair will gauge your knowledge of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and evolutionary agents. To pass the quiz, you'll need to know how to find the population makeups using the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium equation and how to identify the correct evolutionary agents in a population.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

Use this printable worksheet and quiz to review:

  • Problems using the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium equation
  • Evolutionary agents in a population
  • Allelic frequencies

Skills Practiced

  • Interpreting information - verify you can read information regarding Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and interpret it correctly
  • Knowledge application - use your knowledge to identify the evolutionary agents in a population
  • Problem solving - use acquired knowledge to solve problems using the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium equation

Additional Learning

To learn more about why a population might not be living up to initial predictions, review the corresponding lesson titled Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium III: Evolutionary Agents. This lesson will help you:

  • Define evolutionary agent
  • Understand how the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium equation can be used to test the status of a population
  • Show what to do when a population fails to comply with predictions from the equation
  • Appreciate how to infer which evolutionary agents are affecting the population
  • Describe the reason a population might suffer from bottleneck
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