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Ch 6: AEPA ELA: Literary Devices

About This Chapter

Get caught up on the use of literary devices by watching this chapter's tutorial lessons. After your review, you should be prepared to answer these types of questions on the AEPA ELA exam.

AEPA ELA: Literary Devices - Chapter Summary

These online video lessons help you review tone and mood as well as the use of euphemisms in literature in preparation for the AEPA ELA exam. In addition, you could strengthen your knowledge of catharsis and point of view in literature. The lessons can also help you with:

  • Providing examples of foreshadowing
  • Describing the history of literary catharsis and allegory in literature
  • Outlining the contrasts between litotes and understatement
  • Identifying literary examples of euphemisms
  • Explaining the differences between first, second and third point of view
  • Analyzing tone and mood

Through this chapter's assessment quizzes, you can determine which areas you should study further as you get ready to take the AEPA ELA examination. The written transcripts in this Literary Devices chapter include bold terms that you can click on to explore related lessons. Use your mobile device to access the lessons 24/7. You can submit questions to your instructors for expert assistance.

AEPA ELA: Literary Devices - Chapter Objectives

Your ability to evaluate the use of literary devices will be assessed during the Analyzing and Interpreting Literature domain of the AEPA ELA examination. This domain is the equivalent of 23% of the overall score. The exam includes 150 multiple-choice questions and is computer-administered. Test candidates are given three hours for completion of the entire test.

7 Lessons in Chapter 6: AEPA ELA: Literary Devices
What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

1. What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

Learn about how authors use foreshadowing, both subtle and direct, as part of their storytelling process. Explore many examples of foreshadowing, from classical plays to contemporary stories.

What is Catharsis? - Definition, Examples & History in Literature and Drama

2. What is Catharsis? - Definition, Examples & History in Literature and Drama

In this lesson, learn about catharsis, a purging of feelings that occurs when audiences have strong emotional reactions to a work of literature. Explore examples of literary works which lead to catharsis, including tragedies.

Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

3. Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

Learn about allegories and how stories can be used to deliver messages, lessons or even commentaries on big concepts and institutions. Explore how allegories range from straightforward to heavily-veiled and subtle.

Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

4. Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

In this lesson, explore the use of understatement as a way to draw attention to a specific quality or to add humor. Learn about litotes, a specific form of understatement, and discover examples from literature.

Euphemism: Definition & Examples

5. Euphemism: Definition & Examples

This lesson defines euphemisms, alternate language used in place of offensive language or when discussing taboo topics. Explore some examples of euphemisms in everyday language and well-known examples from literature.

Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

6. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

Just who is telling this story? In this lesson, we'll look at point of view, or the perspective from which a work is told. We'll review first person, second person and third person points of view.

Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

7. Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

In this lesson, we will define the literary terms tone and mood. We will then discuss how to identify each of them, as well as how to identify them in small reading passages.

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