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Ch 6: African American Writers: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The African American Writers chapter of this 10th Grade English Help and Review course is the simplest way to learn about African American writers. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of African American writers.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering 10th grade English material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn 10th grade English. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the Harlem Renaissance or African American writers
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning English (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about African American writers
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra English learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the African American Writers chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the African American Writers chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any question on African American writers. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

In this chapter, you'll learn the answers to questions including::

  • What was the Harlem Renaissance?
  • Who was Langston Hughes, and what were some of his major poems?
  • What was Claude McKay's role in the Harlem Renaissance?
  • What was Countee Cullen's role in the Harlem Renaissance?
  • Who are some contemporary African American writers?

11 Lessons in Chapter 6: African American Writers: Help and Review
The Harlem Renaissance: Novels and Poetry from the Jazz Age

1. The Harlem Renaissance: Novels and Poetry from the Jazz Age

The Harlem Renaissance was a movement in the 1920s and 1930s during which there was an explosion of African-American art and literature. This lesson looks at the themes, causes, and important figures of the Harlem Renaissance.

Frederick Douglass: Narrative and Style

2. Frederick Douglass: Narrative and Style

In this lesson, we will learn about Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave who became one of the most powerful voices in the abolitionist movement in the United States. In addition, we will examine his written work, most notably his first autobiography - ''Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.''

Countee Cullen's Role in the Harlem Renaissance: An Analysis of Heritage

3. Countee Cullen's Role in the Harlem Renaissance: An Analysis of Heritage

The Harlem Renaissance exposed the world to everyone from W.E.B. DuBois to Ella Fitzgerald. In this lesson, we'll explore one of the movement's most iconic and resonant poems, Countee Cullen's 'Heritage.'

Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes were Watching God: Summary & Analysis

4. Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes were Watching God: Summary & Analysis

Zora Neale Hurston's novel 'Their Eyes Were Watching God' is a famous Harlem Renaissance novel that examines race and gender issues through the eyes of its main character, Janie Crawford. This lesson gives a synopsis of the novel and examines how it approaches race and gender.

Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Poems of the Jazz Age

5. Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Poems of the Jazz Age

Langston Hughes was a popular poet from the Harlem Renaissance. His Jazz Age poems, including 'Harlem' and 'I, Too, Sing America,' discussed the racism facing African Americans in the 1920s and '30s.

Claude McKay: Role in Harlem Renaissance & 'America' Analysis

6. Claude McKay: Role in Harlem Renaissance & 'America' Analysis

Claude McKay was an influential Harlem Renaissance poet. His poems 'America' and 'If We Must Die' explored the complicated relationship African Americans had with the world around them.

Ralph Ellison: Invisible Man Summary and Analysis

7. Ralph Ellison: Invisible Man Summary and Analysis

If people only see you as a part of a race, and not as an individual, are you still a person? In this lesson, we'll analyze Ralph Ellison's important and critically acclaimed novel, 'Invisible Man.'

Richard Wright's Black Boy: Summary and Analysis

8. Richard Wright's Black Boy: Summary and Analysis

After his fiction masterpiece 'Native Son,' Richard Wright wrote a deeply personal and moving autobiography, covering his childhood in the South and his life as an adult in Chicago. In this lesson, we'll explore 'Black Boy.'

Maya Angelou: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and Poetry

9. Maya Angelou: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and Poetry

'I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings' is the autobiography of American poet Maya Angelou. While the story is often difficult to read, it shows how a strong person can overcome difficult obstacles and achieve great things. Learn more about the inspiring life story of one of the country's greatest writers.

Contemporary African American Writers: Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, James Baldwin

10. Contemporary African American Writers: Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, James Baldwin

In this lesson, we will look at the role of contemporary African American writing. The focus will be on authors Toni Morrison, Alice Walker and James Baldwin.

Figurative Language in King's I Have a Dream Speech

11. Figurative Language in King's I Have a Dream Speech

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s ''I Have a Dream'' speech is a well-known civil rights message that is filled with figurative language. In this lesson, we will learn about some of the literary devices that are used in this speech.

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