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Ch 24: AP World History: World War I

About This Chapter

Watch World War I video lessons and learn about the causes of the war, American involvement, the road to peace and more. These lessons are just a portion of our AP World History course.

AP World History: World War I - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

This chapter begins with an examination of the factors that led to World War I. You'll learn about the United States' initial position of isolation in the war and how the country eventually became involved. Lessons also cover the end of the war with the signing of the Peace of Paris. You can learn about the rise of communism in the Soviet Union and the ascension of Josef Stalin. Finally, you'll look into the causes of the Wall Street crash of 1929, which produced the Great Depression. After completing this chapter, you should be able to:

  • Identify the events and factors that led up to World War I
  • Explain American involvement in the war
  • Describe the end of World War I and the terms of peace
  • Chronicle the rise of communism
  • Analyze the contributing factors to the Great Depression

Video Objective
Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War Discuss the events that contributed to the advent of World War I.
The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation and Intervention Learn about the United States' original position toward the belligerent nations in World War I.
American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry Analyze the changing course of the war after America's entry.
The Peace of Paris: Ending World War I Understand the factors that ended the war, including Russia's departure, and name the terms of peace.
The Rise of Communism and Vladimir Lenin Chronicle the rise of communism under the influence of Vladimir Lenin.
The Soviet Union Under Stalin Explore the Soviet Union's shift to totalitarianism under Josef Stalin.
The Great Depression: The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and Other Causes List the contributing factors that led to the Wall Street crash of 1929 and the Great Depression.

12 Lessons in Chapter 24: AP World History: World War I
Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

1. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

World War I: Causes, Characteristics & Effects

2. World War I: Causes, Characteristics & Effects

In this lesson, we will identify the causes, characteristics, and effects of World War I. We will highlight key figures, events, and developments that relate to these aspects of World War I.

World War One: On Land, at Sea & In the Air

3. World War One: On Land, at Sea & In the Air

In this lesson, we will look specifically at the way World War I was waged on land, at sea, and in the air. We will explore how warfare was conducted within these contexts, and learn about the new technologies that made this possible.

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

4. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

WWI: America's Entry and Russia's Exit

5. WWI: America's Entry and Russia's Exit

In this lesson, we will learn about America's entry into World War I in 1917, and Russia's exit from the war between 1917 and 1918. We will learn about what led to these developments, and how they affected the course of the war.

Famous Battles of the First World War

6. Famous Battles of the First World War

In this lesson, we will learn about some of the famous battles of World War I. We will learn why these battles are important and how they affected the course of the war.

American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

7. American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

As much as the U.S. wanted to stay neutral during World War I, it proved impossible. This meant the U.S. had to raise the forces and money to wage war. Find out how Americans played their part in WWI in this lesson.

The Peace of Paris: Ending World War I

8. The Peace of Paris: Ending World War I

In this lesson, we will learn about the end of World War I and the Peace of Paris. We will learn what events transpired to bring about the end of the war and what provisions were laid forth in the Treaty of Versailles.

The Rise of Communism & Vladimir Lenin

9. The Rise of Communism & Vladimir Lenin

In this lesson, we will examine the role Vladimir Lenin played as a leading architect of the communist system. We will explore his involvement in the Russian Revolution and the establishment of Soviet Russia.

The Soviet Union Under Stalin: Five-Year Plans, Purges & Policies

10. The Soviet Union Under Stalin: Five-Year Plans, Purges & Policies

In this lesson, we explore the brutal rule of Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union, from 1928 to 1953. Stalin radically transformed the economy of the Soviet Union, while also terrorizing its people.

The Great Depression: The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and Other Causes

11. The Great Depression: The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and Other Causes

October 29, 1929, marked the beginning of the Great Depression in the United States. Learn about this event, including the factors that contributed to the collapse of the American economy.

Racial Tension During & After World War I

12. Racial Tension During & After World War I

While the Civil War may have introduced the United States to a new type of racial tension, it was World War I in which these tensions became fully exposed. This lesson tells how a country that fought for freedom ended up giving birth, again, to the KKK.

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