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Ch 3: Campbell Biology Chapter 3: Water and Life

About This Chapter

The Water and Life chapter of this Campbell Biology Companion Course helps students learn the essential lessons associated with water and life. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Water and Life textbook chapter.

How It Works:

  • Identify the lessons in the Campbell Biology Water and Life chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons with this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the water and life topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • The structure of water molecules
  • Properties of water
  • Types of phase changes
  • The difference between solutes and solvents
  • Characteristics of hydrophilic molecules
  • Properties of hydrophobic compounds
  • How to calculate molarity and molality
  • What extremophiles are
  • The difference between acids and bases
  • How to calculate a solution's pH or pOH
  • The acidity constant
  • Impact of ocean acidification on water quality

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12 Lessons in Chapter 3: Campbell Biology Chapter 3: Water and Life
Facts About Water Molecules: Structure & Properties

1. Facts About Water Molecules: Structure & Properties

Water is more unique than you might think, despite the huge quantities available on our planet. This lesson explores the structure of water and how it contributes to the properties we find so useful.

Properties of Water

2. Properties of Water

Why does ice float? Why can water rise on its own against gravity in a small tube? Find out how these mysterious properties of water can be explained by hydrogen bonds.

Phase Change: Evaporation, Condensation, Freezing, Melting, Sublimation & Deposition

3. Phase Change: Evaporation, Condensation, Freezing, Melting, Sublimation & Deposition

Substances on Earth can exist in one of four phases, but mostly, they exist in one of three: solid, liquid or gas. Learn the six changes of phase: freezing, melting, condensation, vaporization, sublimation and deposition.

Solutions, Solutes, and Solvents

4. Solutions, Solutes, and Solvents

Oh no! Your friend Ben just drank chili oil on a dare, and now his mouth is burning. Should he drink the ice water or vegetable oil to cool his mouth? Quick. Watch this lesson if you aren't sure.

Hydrophilic: Definition & Interaction

5. Hydrophilic: Definition & Interaction

Water is considered to be the 'universal' solvent, however, only hydrophilic materials will dissolve in water readily. This lesson discusses the properties of hydrophilic compounds.

What is Hydrophobic? - Definition & Interactions

6. What is Hydrophobic? - Definition & Interactions

In chemistry, water is considered to be the universal solvent, and materials that are hydrophilic can dissolve in it. Hydrophobic molecules, however, do not dissolve in water. This lesson discusses the characteristics necessary for molecules to be considered hydrophobic.

Calculating Molarity and Molality Concentration

7. Calculating Molarity and Molality Concentration

Learn what molarity and molality are and how to calculate each one. Learn that molarity is abbreviated as M and is moles of solute per liter of solution and that molality is abbreviated as m and is moles of solute per kilogram of solvent.

Is There Life on Other Planets?

8. Is There Life on Other Planets?

This lesson will explore the places and conditions in our solar system and beyond that may make life possible. We'll discuss extremophiles, the habitable zone, Mars, and Europa.

Acids and Bases

9. Acids and Bases

Have you ever wondered how we measure the acidity of liquids? Check out this lesson to see how acids and bases are measured on a pH scale and how they relate to neutral solutions, such as water.

The pH Scale: Calculating the pH of a Solution

10. The pH Scale: Calculating the pH of a Solution

Learn the history of the pH scale, how to describe it and why it is used by scientists. Discover how to calculate the pH of an acid or base solutions given either the hydroxide ion concentration or the hydronium ion concentration. Learn how to start with the pH and calculate the hydroxide and hydronium ion concentrations.

Weak Acids, Weak Bases, and Buffers

11. Weak Acids, Weak Bases, and Buffers

This lesson covers both strong and weak acids and bases, using human blood as an example for the discussion. Other concepts discussed included conjugate acids and bases, the acidity constant, and buffer systems within the blood.

Effects of Ocean Acidification on Water Quality

12. Effects of Ocean Acidification on Water Quality

The ocean is a natural atmospheric sink for carbon dioxide. When carbon dioxide dissolves in seawater, it reacts with water to form carbonic acid, lowering the pH of the water. This process is ocean acidification. This lesson explains the chemistry behind this and discusses the environmental impacts.

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