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Ch 3: Constitutional Law Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Constitutional Law chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach civil liberties in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes, and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Constitutional Law chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

Day Topics Key Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday The rule of law The rule of law as demonstrated by the Johnson v. State decision
Tuesday The First Amendment Freedoms guaranteed to individual citizens by the First Amendment and restrictions on commercial speech
Wednesday The Fourth Amendment Protections from illegal search and seizure, the expectation of privacy, and probable cause
Thursday The Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments Procedural and substantive due process, the equal protection clause, and discriminatory laws
Friday The Ninth Amendment Rights retained by the people and the Griswold v. Connecticut decision

6 Lessons in Chapter 3: Constitutional Law Lesson Plans
What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

1. What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

Rule of law takes on several meanings. On one hand, it means that no person or government is above the law. In another, it means that no government or its officials can enforce laws that are unfair or unjust.

The First Amendment: Commercial Speech, Scrutiny & Restrictions

2. The First Amendment: Commercial Speech, Scrutiny & Restrictions

The First Amendment of the Constitution states that all citizens are free to practice their preferred religion, speak freely and to assemble. Learn how and why businesses are less protected and are held to a higher scrutiny in this lesson.

The Fourth Amendment: Search & Seizure

3. The Fourth Amendment: Search & Seizure

One of our rights according to the Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution is the Fourth Amendment, and it protects citizens from illegal search and seizure of person or property with proper warrants stating probable cause.

Due Process & Taking the Fifth & Fourteenth Amendments

4. Due Process & Taking the Fifth & Fourteenth Amendments

There are only two amendments that stand for the same rights: the 5th Amendment and 14th Amendment. In this lesson, we will learn how both amendments speak to the rights of life, liberty and property with government protection and due process.

The Equal Protection Clause in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments

5. The Equal Protection Clause in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments

Both the 5th Amendment and the 14th Amendment of the US Constitution provide all citizens with equal protection of their right to life, liberty and property. The main difference being the 5th Amendment provides it under the Due Process clause.

Ninth Amendment: Rights Retained by People

6. Ninth Amendment: Rights Retained by People

The purpose of the Ninth Amendment is to protect the citizens' rights that aren't necessarily mentioned elsewhere in the Constitution, like the right to privacy or the right to marry. It also prevents the violation of those rights by the government.

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