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Ch 6: CSET Business - Motivation

About This Chapter

Let us teach you about motivation in business. The video lessons and self-assessment quizzes provide instruction and examples to help you correctly answer related questions on the CSET Business test.

CSET Business Subtest I: Motivation - Chapter Summary

Improve your comprehension of motivation in a business environment with this chapter's instructional videos. Lessons go over concepts and theories such as the following to help you prepare for related questions on the CSET Business Subtest I:

  • Differentiating between and understanding the applicability of intrinsic and extrinsic workplace rewards
  • Understanding behavioral management theory and how it pertains to professional productivity
  • Assimilating the sources and implications of the neoclassical theory of management
  • Recognizing the relevance of the Hawthorne effect
  • Comprehending needs-based and behavior-based theories of motivation
  • Understanding and distinguishing among various motivational theories, including Alderfer's ERG theory, Vroom's expectancy theory, Thorndike's reinforcement theory, McClelland's acquired needs theory, etc.
  • Grasping the Theory X and Theory Y perception of management
  • Understanding the influence and utilization of the Pygmalion Effect in the workplace

Concepts are broken down and covered in brief, comprehensive video lessons that help familiarize you with information you may encounter on the business CSET. Understanding the numerous available theories of professional motivation can arm you with an expanded understanding of the social aspects of business.

Objectives of the CSET Business Subtest I: Motivation Chapter

The Business CSET is intended to determine a prospective teacher's understanding of business and preparedness to acquire certification to teach it. Lessons in this Motivation chapter offer instruction in areas addressed on Subtest I of the CSET Business exam, which makes up one-third of the total test. Each lesson is accompanied by a practice quiz, which exposes you to the kinds of questions you may find on the CSET and allows you to evaluate your comprehension of the lessons' subject matter.

On the Subtest I, you will be asked 40 multiple-choice questions and 2 constructed-response questions. Half of the questions are drawn from the realm of business management, while the other half relate to marketing.

14 Lessons in Chapter 6: CSET Business - Motivation
Reward Systems & Employee Behavior: Intrinsic & Extrinsic Rewards

1. Reward Systems & Employee Behavior: Intrinsic & Extrinsic Rewards

Have you ever wondered why some employees are more motivated than others to work at a higher level of productivity? This lesson explains how managers use intrinsic and extrinsic rewards to reinforce positive employee behavior.

Behavioral Management Theory: Understanding Employee Behavior & Motivation

2. Behavioral Management Theory: Understanding Employee Behavior & Motivation

Behavioral management theory was developed in response to the need to account for employee behavior and motivation. The shift moved management from a production orientation (classical leadership theory) to a leadership style focused on the workers' human need for work-related satisfaction and good working conditions.

Neoclassical Theory of Management: The Human Relations Approach

3. Neoclassical Theory of Management: The Human Relations Approach

In the early 1920s, a shift away from classical management theory took place as theorists began to consider the human side of an organization and the social needs of employees. In this lesson, you will learn about the evolution of the neoclassical theory of management and its two sources: the human relations movement and the behavioral management movement.

The Hawthorne Effect: The Study of Employee Productivity

4. The Hawthorne Effect: The Study of Employee Productivity

Does your behavior change when you think people are watching? This lesson describes the purpose and findings of the Hawthorne studies and their contribution to the practice of management.

Motivation Theory: Needs-Based & Behavior-Based

5. Motivation Theory: Needs-Based & Behavior-Based

There are two schools of thought used to explain employee motivation in the workplace. Needs-based theory states that employees have certain needs that must be met in order to be motivated to perform. Behavior-based theory believes motivating factors influence behavior towards work.

The Needs Theory: Motivating Employees with Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

6. The Needs Theory: Motivating Employees with Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Hunger, thirst, security, friendship, respect and being all that you can be are just some of the things that motivate us to take action. This lesson helps us to further understand these needs and how they motivate behavior by showing where they fall in Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

Alderfer's ERG Theory & Employee Motivation in the Workplace

7. Alderfer's ERG Theory & Employee Motivation in the Workplace

Alderfer's ERG theory is a simplified version of Maslow's hierarchy of needs that suggests that all human needs can be accessed and satisfied simultaneously, rather than from the bottom up. Either way, as needs are satisfied, employees are motivated to strive to satisfy a new need.

Acquired Needs Theory: Need for Achievement, Power & Affiliation

8. Acquired Needs Theory: Need for Achievement, Power & Affiliation

Do you act out of a need for achievement, power or affiliation? This lesson describes the acquired needs theory and how one of the three types of needs affect us more than the others.

Theory X & Theory Y: Two Types of Managers

9. Theory X & Theory Y: Two Types of Managers

Have you ever thought your boss despises you and all your co-workers? Or maybe you've lucked out and your superiors really encourage you to be yourself. This lesson describes the two types of managers you might have, Theory X and Theory Y. Find out how the idea of self-fulfilling prophecies affects employees actions according to Douglas McGregor.

Equity Theory of Motivation: Reward & Effort

10. Equity Theory of Motivation: Reward & Effort

Have you ever noticed that some employees seem to work harder than others for the same reward? Why does that happen? This lesson explains how equity theory is used by managers to motivate employees by providing a high reward for equivalent efforts on part of the employee.

Vroom's Expectancy Theory of Employee Motivation

11. Vroom's Expectancy Theory of Employee Motivation

Finding the right equation for motivating employees can be challenging. This lesson explains how expectancy theory is used to motivate employees by increasing the motivation to act based on a set of specific criteria.

Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory: Hygiene Factors & Motivation

12. Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory: Hygiene Factors & Motivation

This lesson describes Frederick Herzberg's two-factor theory, which is based on the idea of how hygiene factors and satisfiers or motivators are used to provide satisfaction to employees in work environments.

Thorndike's Reinforcement Theory: Using Consequences to Motivate Employees

13. Thorndike's Reinforcement Theory: Using Consequences to Motivate Employees

In the workplace, there are levels of acceptable behavior. As a manager, it is important to use appropriate techniques that reinforce acceptable behavior and deter inappropriate behavior. This lesson describes how reinforcement theory is used to influence employee behavior through consequences.

The Pygmalion Effect: Influencing Employee Behavior

14. The Pygmalion Effect: Influencing Employee Behavior

Setting expectations for employee performance and behavior is one of the primary responsibilities of management. This lesson defines the Pygmalion Effect and describes how it is used to influence employee behavior.

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