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Ch 11: GED Science - Biomolecules: Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The Biomolecules chapter of this GED Science Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about biomolecules. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long and they teach all of the structures and functions of biomolecules required in a typical GED science course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other GED science work.
  • Identify the biomolecules concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our GED science tutoring solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn about biomolecules and earn better grades. This resource can help students including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding organic molecules, carbohydrate function, lipids, proteins, DNA, RNA types or any other biomolecules topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their science learning
  • Prefer learning science visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their biomolecules unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in GED science
  • Don't have access to their science teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning about biomolecules simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live GED science tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn about biomolecules on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and rewatch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Examine the functional groups of organic molecules.
  • Take a look at monomers and polymers.
  • Describe the structures and functions of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.
  • Discuss complementary base pairing in DNA.
  • Become familiar with the double helix structure of DNA.
  • Explain the difference between DNA and RNA.

18 Lessons in Chapter 11: GED Science - Biomolecules: Tutoring Solution
Introduction to Organic Molecules I: Functional Groups

1. Introduction to Organic Molecules I: Functional Groups

If you've ever wondered what gives vinegar that sour flavor, you may not realize that you have contemplated functional groups. View this lesson for an introduction to organic chemistry, functional groups and how they are part of your daily life.

Introduction to Organic Molecules II: Monomers and Polymers

2. Introduction to Organic Molecules II: Monomers and Polymers

From everyday man-made items like milk jugs and styrofoam to natural proteins and plant materials, the world is full of polymers! Check out this lesson to learn how polymers are constructed on a molecular level.

Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

3. Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are found in many foods that we eat and may be found as sugars, starches, or fiber. Learn more about these three distinct types of carbohydrates, and how they are distinguished through their chemical structures in this lesson.

Structure and Function of Lipids

4. Structure and Function of Lipids

Molecules called lipids have long hydrocarbon chains that determine the way they act. They can be fats, oils, or hormones, and even exist in our cell membranes. Learn more about the chemical structure and biological function of various lipids in this lesson.

Proteins I: Structure and Function

5. Proteins I: Structure and Function

We need our proteins, not just as a major food group but for the many useful roles that they play in our bodies. In our introductory lesson to proteins, you'll learn about the many functions we rely on them to perform.

Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

6. Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

In this lesson, we'll take a deeper look at amino acids. You'll learn what makes a peptide, and what separates a protein from other kinds of amino acid bonds.

DNA: Chemical Structure of Nucleic Acids & Phosphodiester Bonds

7. DNA: Chemical Structure of Nucleic Acids & Phosphodiester Bonds

In this lesson, you'll discover what nucleotides look like and how they come together to form polynucleotides. We'll also explore nucleic acids and focus on DNA in particular.

DNA: Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, Thymine & Complementary Base Pairing

8. DNA: Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, Thymine & Complementary Base Pairing

Learn the language of nucleotides as we look at the nitrogenous bases adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine. Armed with this knowledge, you'll also see why DNA strands must run in opposite directions.

DNA: Double Helix Structure and Hereditary Molecule

9. DNA: Double Helix Structure and Hereditary Molecule

This lesson will help you to navigate the twists and turns of DNA's structure. We'll also clue you in on the amazing discoveries that put this nucleic acid in the limelight as the molecule of heredity.

Differences Between RNA and DNA & Types of RNA (mRNA, tRNA & rRNA)

10. Differences Between RNA and DNA & Types of RNA (mRNA, tRNA & rRNA)

In this lesson, you'll explore RNA structure and learn the central dogma of molecular biology. Along the way, you'll meet the three types of RNA and see how the cell uses them most effectively.

Activation Energy of Enzymes: Definition, Calculation & Example

11. Activation Energy of Enzymes: Definition, Calculation & Example

With this lesson you will understand what the activation energy of a chemical reaction is. You will also learn what enzymes are and how they affect chemical reactions.

Amine: Definition, Structure, Reactions & Formula

12. Amine: Definition, Structure, Reactions & Formula

What does the fried fish you eat and dog poop have in common? The answer is amines. In this lesson, we will learn about the chemical structure of amines and how they react.

Carrier Proteins: Types & Functions

13. Carrier Proteins: Types & Functions

In this lesson, you'll learn the definition of a carrier protein. Also, you'll explore the types of carrier proteins and find out how they each assist molecules as they pass through the cell membrane.

Electrolyte: Definition & Examples

14. Electrolyte: Definition & Examples

Electrolytes are charged particles that are critical for biological systems. They play a role in many of the bodily functions of humans, and must be maintained for proper health. This lesson discusses electrolytes and their role in the body.

Enantiomers: Definition, Properties & Examples

15. Enantiomers: Definition, Properties & Examples

Just like how our hands are mirror images of each other, molecules can also have mirror images that cannot be superimposed on each other. These molecules are called enantiomers. In this lesson, we'll discuss their properties and show some examples.

Inhibitors: Definition & Types

16. Inhibitors: Definition & Types

In this lesson, we introduce the concept of a chemical inhibitor, how chemists use them to stop or modify reactions, and common types of chemical inhibitors you may encounter in everyday life.

What is Sucrose? - Function, Structure & Chemical Equation

17. What is Sucrose? - Function, Structure & Chemical Equation

Sucrose is a type of sugar that is present in almost everything we eat. It is a natural compound and one that gives us valuable energy, but it can be harmful when over-consumed.

Enzyme-Substrate Complex: Definition & Overview

18. Enzyme-Substrate Complex: Definition & Overview

Enzymes are almost everywhere in your body. Discover where they are found, how they work and why they are important. Learn two models for how the enzyme-substrate complex is formed as well as the changes that could cause this bonding to fail.

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the GED Science: Tutoring Solution course

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