Login

Ch 15: Gross Anatomy of Muscular System: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Gross Anatomy of the Muscular System chapter of this Human Anatomy and Physiology Help and Review course is the simplest way to master an understanding of the gross anatomy of the muscular system. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of the gross anatomy of the muscular system.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering human anatomy and physiology material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn human anatomy and physiology. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding muscular contraction or the gross anatomy of the muscular system
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning science (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about the gross anatomy of the muscular system
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra science learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Gross Anatomy of the Muscular System chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Gross Anatomy of the Muscular System chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any question about the gross anatomy of the muscular system. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

In this chapter, you'll learn the answer to questions including:

  • How do muscle levers make muscles more efficient?
  • How does muscular contraction cause articulation?
  • How is the type of muscular contraction determined by muscle origin and insertion?
  • What are the muscles of the head and neck and how do they provide support and movement?
  • What are the muscles of the vertebral column and trunk?
  • How do the shoulder muscles provide support and movement to the arms?
  • How do the arm muscles provide support and movement to the forearms?
  • What are the muscles of the forearm and how do they support and move the hands?
  • How do the hip muscles provide support and movement to the thighs?
  • What are the thigh muscles and how do they support and move the legs?
  • How do the leg muscles support and move the feet?

14 Lessons in Chapter 15: Gross Anatomy of Muscular System: Help and Review
How Muscle Levers Affect Muscle Efficiency

1. How Muscle Levers Affect Muscle Efficiency

Muscular contraction creates force to move the weight of our body and body parts. This lesson describes the three lever systems utilized by our body to create movement. The efficiency of each lever type in terms of strength, speed and distance are identified along with examples.

How Muscular Contraction Causes Articulation: Definition & Types

2. How Muscular Contraction Causes Articulation: Definition & Types

Skeletal muscle contraction causes all types of movement. Movement at our joints is referred to as articulation. All articulation is described in reference to the anatomical position, and most articulations are identified in opposite pairs. This lesson identifies and describes the major articulations of the human body.

Muscle Origin and Insertion: Definition and Actions

3. Muscle Origin and Insertion: Definition and Actions

Did you know that groups of muscles are needed for various body movements? Skeletal muscles attached to bone are responsible for movement and support. Muscles work in groups to produce a particular movement. This lesson describes how muscle origins and insertions dictate the type of movement that occurs when a muscle contracts.

Muscles of the Head and Neck: Anatomy, Motion & Support

4. Muscles of the Head and Neck: Anatomy, Motion & Support

The muscles of the head and neck are responsible for a variety of movements, including facial expression, mastication, and eye movement, in addition to moving the head. This lesson identifies and describes the major muscles of the head and neck along with their general action.

Muscles of the Vertebral Column: Support & Movement

5. Muscles of the Vertebral Column: Support & Movement

Did you know that lower back pain can be caused by injury to muscles attached to the vertebral column? This lesson identifies and describes the major erector spinae muscles responsible for erect posture and movement.

Axial Muscles: Trunk Muscles Anatomy & Support

6. Axial Muscles: Trunk Muscles Anatomy & Support

The trunk, or torso, of the human body contains several important muscle groups that aid in breathing and provide support to other parts of our anatomy. This lesson explores the location and function of the major axial muscles.

Shoulder Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

7. Shoulder Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

The shoulder contains muscles that not only stabilize the shoulder but also move the arm. This lesson identifies and describes the muscles responsible for shoulder positioning, adduction, abduction, flexion, extension and shoulder rotation.

Arm Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

8. Arm Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

Did you know that push-ups require contraction of the triceps brachii? The muscles that move the forearm can be categorized based on general action. This lesson identifies the major forearm flexors, extensors, supinators and pronators.

Forearm Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

9. Forearm Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

Did you know the muscles that move the hand, fingers and thumb are located in the forearm? This lesson identifies and describes the major muscles that flex and extend the wrist, fingers and thumb.

Hip Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

10. Hip Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

Did you know the gluteal muscles of the buttocks are among the strongest in the body? These muscles, along with other muscles, originate from the pelvic girdle and insert on the femur, producing movement of the thigh.

Thigh Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

11. Thigh Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

Did you know the thigh is the part of the lower appendage proximal to the knee? The muscles of the thigh move the leg at the knee. This lesson will identify the major muscles involved in flexion and extension of the leg at the knee, including the hamstrings and quadriceps femoris groups.

Leg Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

12. Leg Muscles: Anatomy, Support & Movement

The larger muscles that move the foot and toes are located in the leg, while smaller muscles are located in the foot. This lesson describes the major muscles responsible for the various movements of the foot at the ankle and the toes.

All or None Law: Definition & Overview

13. All or None Law: Definition & Overview

The all or none law refers to how your nerve cells function - they either respond to a stimulus completely or not at all; there is no in between. In this lesson, we'll take a closer look as to how this works.

What is Anatomy? - Definition & History

14. What is Anatomy? - Definition & History

This lesson explores what the field of anatomy is and introduces some branches of anatomy. It also examines some of the pivotal moments and people within anatomy's varied history.

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 79 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 2,000 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support