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Ch 6: Group Decisions: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Group Decisions chapter of this Social Psychology Help and Review course is the simplest way to master group decisions. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of group decisions.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering social psychology material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn social psychology. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding group behaviors and group decision processes
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning psychology (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about group decisions
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra psychology learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the group decisions chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the group decisions chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any group decisions question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a group decisions unit of a standard social psychology course. Topics covered include:

  • Methods for disagreeing with a group
  • Descriptive and injunctive group standards
  • Leadership styles and types
  • Majority and minority influence
  • Stanley Milgram's experiment
  • Groupthink, social loafing and social roles

21 Lessons in Chapter 6: Group Decisions: Help and Review
How to Disagree with the Group: Examples of Idiosyncrasy Credits

1. How to Disagree with the Group: Examples of Idiosyncrasy Credits

In this lesson, you will learn about idiosyncrasy credit and the power it gives someone to disagree with the group. You will also learn how idiosyncrasy credit provides minority group members influence over majority decisions.

Group Psychology: Minority vs. Majority Influence

2. Group Psychology: Minority vs. Majority Influence

How would you change a belief or opinion of the majority to match your own? Is it even possible? Serge Moscovici believed it is and further stated that all progress is a result of the minority influence over the majority.

Injunctive and Descriptive Group Norms: Definitions, Differences & Examples

3. Injunctive and Descriptive Group Norms: Definitions, Differences & Examples

What is normal? Some people consider it normal to do the same thing everyone else is doing. Others may consider it normal to do what is proper, or expected. Discover why each is an example of using either an injunctive or a descriptive norm.

Asch's Line Experiment: Conformity and Social Norms

4. Asch's Line Experiment: Conformity and Social Norms

Would you change a belief or opinion to fit in with a group? Solomon Asch believed that most people would conform just to go along with the social norm, and he conducted an experiment to test his theory.

Social Roles: Philip Zimbardo's Prison Experiment

5. Social Roles: Philip Zimbardo's Prison Experiment

Philip Zimbardo ran a notorious experiment, simulating a prison scenario in the basement of a Stanford University building. As a result of the experiment, psychologists learned how situations affect behavior and the importance of ethics in psychology.

Stanley Milgram: Experiment & Obedience

6. Stanley Milgram: Experiment & Obedience

Learn about Stanley Milgram's famous experiment on obedience to authority and what may determine obedience. Then, test yourself on why his experiment had such an impact in the psychology field.

Leadership Styles and Types: Authoritarian, Laissez-Faire & Democratic

7. Leadership Styles and Types: Authoritarian, Laissez-Faire & Democratic

Most of us are members of many different social groups, and several of those groups have leaders. In this lesson, we define and discuss both instrumental and expressive leadership in groups. We also cover three leadership decision-making styles: authoritarian, democratic, and laissez-faire.

Groupthink: Definition & Examples

8. Groupthink: Definition & Examples

Some groups are quick to make decisions to maintain cohesion, but this can be a critical mistake to make. This lesson explains the concept of groupthink using the Challenger explosion as an example.

Social Loafing & Social Facilitation: Definition and Effects of Groups

9. Social Loafing & Social Facilitation: Definition and Effects of Groups

Do you prefer to work in a group or by yourself? Why? Working in a group certainly has a number of advantages and disadvantages. In this lesson, we discuss three phenomena that can occur as a result of working in groups: groupthink, social loafing, and social facilitation.

What is the Prisoner's Dilemma? - Albert Tucker & Game Theory

10. What is the Prisoner's Dilemma? - Albert Tucker & Game Theory

Do you make decisions based on your own self- interest? In this lesson, we'll take a look at the famous 'prisoner's dilemma' game to see if individuals, when faced with a competitive or cooperative decision, will choose selfish or selfless outcomes.

Reference Group in Sociology: Definition, Examples & Types

11. Reference Group in Sociology: Definition, Examples & Types

A reference group is a group that we compare ourselves to for the purpose of evaluating our behaviors. Learn more about the different types of reference groups from examples and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Democratic Decision-Making Style: Definition & Overview

12. Democratic Decision-Making Style: Definition & Overview

There are many ways that decisions can be made in the professional world. This lesson explains the democratic decision-making style by showing how this process works. A quiz is provided to assess your knowledge of the topic.

Group Patterns: Definition & Explanation

13. Group Patterns: Definition & Explanation

In this lesson group patterns will be defined and identified. Group patterns are often used in social science, but can be used economically. Group patterns can also be used negatively. Examples will be provided and a test will follow.

Interactionist Approach: Definition & Explanation

14. Interactionist Approach: Definition & Explanation

Symbolic interaction, or interactionism, is one of the major theoretical perspectives in sociology. Let's take a look at some key theories and concepts of this perspective and look at some examples.

Nonverbal Cues in Communication: Examples & Overview

15. Nonverbal Cues in Communication: Examples & Overview

Did you know that your nonverbal cues can communicate your mood and personality? In this lesson, we'll talk about the different types of nonverbal cues and look at some real-life examples.

Retreatism: Definition, Modes & Examples

16. Retreatism: Definition, Modes & Examples

In this lesson, we will explore the idea of retreatism and how it can lead people to abandon social norms and withdraw from mainstream society. Then you can test your new knowledge with a fun quiz!

Risky Shift Phenomenon in Psychology: Definition & Examples

17. Risky Shift Phenomenon in Psychology: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we'll be looking at what many have called mob mentality, or what is more accurately known in the field of psychology as the risky shift phenomenon. We'll also look at some examples to further illustrate it, and you'll be able to test your knowledge with a quiz!

Collectivism: Definition & Examples

18. Collectivism: Definition & Examples

Collectivism is a political, economic, or cultural system that privileges the needs of groups and communities over individuals. See some examples of collectivism, and test your understanding with a brief quiz.

Decision Making: Process & Models

19. Decision Making: Process & Models

Have you noticed that some groups seem to work very well together when making decisions, and others seem unable to make decisions? This lesson discusses the process of making group decisions and various models associated with making decisions.

Decision Making: Definition & Types

20. Decision Making: Definition & Types

How do you make decisions? When we talk about deciding between choices we can break the processes into types. This lesson will fill you in on the different ways to make decisions and give you a few examples of each.

Reflective Equilibrium: Definition & Examples

21. Reflective Equilibrium: Definition & Examples

Are your moral beliefs consistent across different issues? Can you justify why you believe certain things? In this lesson we'll talk about the philosophical concept of reflective equilibrium, which is a deliberative process whereby we evaluate our moral beliefs.

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