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Ch 6: Group Decisions: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Group Decisions chapter of this Social Psychology Homework Help course helps students complete their group decisions homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your group decisions homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample problems and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your group decisions homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Methods for disagreeing with the group
  • Minority and majority influence in group psychology
  • Injunctive and descriptive group norms
  • Asch's line experiment
  • Philip Zimbardo's prison experiment and social roles
  • Stanley Milgram's obedience experiment
  • Leadership styles and types
  • Definition and examples of groupthink
  • Social loafing and social facilitation
  • The prisoner's dilemma

17 Lessons in Chapter 6: Group Decisions: Homework Help
How to Disagree with the Group: Examples of Idiosyncrasy Credits

1. How to Disagree with the Group: Examples of Idiosyncrasy Credits

In this lesson, you will learn about idiosyncrasy credit and the power it gives someone to disagree with the group. You will also learn how idiosyncrasy credit provides minority group members influence over majority decisions.

Group Psychology: Minority vs. Majority Influence

2. Group Psychology: Minority vs. Majority Influence

How would you change a belief or opinion of the majority to match your own? Is it even possible? Serge Moscovici believed it is and further stated that all progress is a result of the minority influence over the majority.

Injunctive and Descriptive Group Norms: Definitions, Differences & Examples

3. Injunctive and Descriptive Group Norms: Definitions, Differences & Examples

What is normal? Some people consider it normal to do the same thing everyone else is doing. Others may consider it normal to do what is proper, or expected. Discover why each is an example of using either an injunctive or a descriptive norm.

Asch's Line Experiment: Conformity and Social Norms

4. Asch's Line Experiment: Conformity and Social Norms

Would you change a belief or opinion to fit in with a group? Solomon Asch believed that most people would conform just to go along with the social norm, and he conducted an experiment to test his theory.

Social Roles: Philip Zimbardo's Prison Experiment

5. Social Roles: Philip Zimbardo's Prison Experiment

Philip Zimbardo ran a notorious experiment, simulating a prison scenario in the basement of a Stanford University building. As a result of the experiment, psychologists learned how situations affect behavior and the importance of ethics in psychology.

Stanley Milgram: Experiment & Obedience

6. Stanley Milgram: Experiment & Obedience

Learn about Stanley Milgram's famous experiment on obedience to authority and what may determine obedience. Then, test yourself on why his experiment had such an impact in the psychology field.

Leadership Styles and Types: Authoritarian, Laissez-Faire & Democratic

7. Leadership Styles and Types: Authoritarian, Laissez-Faire & Democratic

Most of us are members of many different social groups, and several of those groups have leaders. In this lesson, we define and discuss both instrumental and expressive leadership in groups. We also cover three leadership decision-making styles: authoritarian, democratic, and laissez-faire.

Groupthink: Definition & Examples

8. Groupthink: Definition & Examples

Some groups are quick to make decisions to maintain cohesion, but this can be a critical mistake to make. This lesson explains the concept of groupthink using the Challenger explosion as an example.

Social Loafing & Social Facilitation: Definition and Effects of Groups

9. Social Loafing & Social Facilitation: Definition and Effects of Groups

Do you prefer to work in a group or by yourself? Why? Working in a group certainly has a number of advantages and disadvantages. In this lesson, we discuss three phenomena that can occur as a result of working in groups: groupthink, social loafing, and social facilitation.

Prisoner's Dilemma

10. Prisoner's Dilemma

Do you make decisions based on your own self- interest? In this lesson, we'll take a look at the famous 'prisoner's dilemma' game to see if individuals, when faced with a competitive or cooperative decision, will choose selfish or selfless outcomes.

Anticipatory Socialization: Definition & Examples

11. Anticipatory Socialization: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will discuss anticipatory socialization. Learn more about the definition of anticipatory socialization and apply this information by reading several examples.

Collective Action: Definition, Theory, Logic & Problems

12. Collective Action: Definition, Theory, Logic & Problems

Minority groups in a democracy are at the mercy of the majority, but there are ways in which they can make their voices heard. In this lesson, we'll discuss the definition of collective action, the theories surrounding these social movements, and the problems that collective efforts face.

Diffusion of Responsibility: Definition, Theory & Examples

13. Diffusion of Responsibility: Definition, Theory & Examples

In this lesson, we will define the theory of diffusion of responsibility, and look into its features. We will also consider real life examples that display the phenomenon.

Group Cohesiveness: Definition, Factors, Importance & Consequences

14. Group Cohesiveness: Definition, Factors, Importance & Consequences

In this lesson, you'll learn about group cohesiveness, why it's important, and some consequences of a cohesive or non-cohesive group. Learn about the factors that affect group cohesiveness with some real-life examples.

The Power Elite by C. Wright Mills: Summary & Concept

15. The Power Elite by C. Wright Mills: Summary & Concept

Learn about C. Wright Mills, the focus of his work, and about his controversial book that critiques the organization of power in the United States. The lesson also offers a short quiz to help you gauge your understanding.

What is a Role Model? - Definition, Importance & Example

16. What is a Role Model? - Definition, Importance & Example

This lesson discusses role models and who qualifies to be one. We'll discuss positive and negative role models. Can you think of role models who have been important in your life?

What is Collective Identity? - Definition, Theory & Examples

17. What is Collective Identity? - Definition, Theory & Examples

Did you know that the Occupy Wall Street movement was powered by collective identity? Learn more about collective identity from examples and test your knowledge with a quiz.

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