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Ch 2: Holt McDougal Biology Chapter 2: Chemistry of Life

About This Chapter

The Chemistry of Life chapter of this Holt McDougal Biology Companion Course helps students learn the essential lessons associated with the chemistry of life. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Chemistry of Life textbook chapter.

How It Works:

  • Identify the lessons in the Holt McDougal Chemistry of Life chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons with this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover topics on the chemistry of life you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • Properties of atoms
  • What ions and covalent compounds are
  • Water's properties
  • Solutes, solvents and solutions
  • Definitions for acids and bases
  • The purpose and properties of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins
  • Amino acid characteristics
  • How to balance chemical reactions
  • The difference between endothermic and exothermic reactions
  • The role of enzymes

Holt McDougal is a registered trademark of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

18 Lessons in Chapter 2: Holt McDougal Biology Chapter 2: Chemistry of Life
The Atom

1. The Atom

Tune into this lesson to find out what matters about matter. What exactly is an atom? And, how do the atoms that make up the elements in the periodic table differ from one another?

Ions: Predicting Formation, Charge, and Formulas of Ions

2. Ions: Predicting Formation, Charge, and Formulas of Ions

Learn how ions are formed using the octet rule. Use the periodic table to predict the charge an atom will have when it becomes an ion. Learn whether an ion is a cation or anion and how to write the formula depending on what charge the ion has.

Covalent Compounds: Properties, Naming & Formation

3. Covalent Compounds: Properties, Naming & Formation

Learn about covalent bonds, how covalent compounds are formed and the properties inherent to covalent compounds, such as low melting and boiling points, in this lesson. Also, learn what rules to follow to name simple covalent compounds.

Properties of Water

4. Properties of Water

Why does ice float? Why can water rise on its own against gravity in a small tube? Find out how these mysterious properties of water can be explained by hydrogen bonds.

Solutions, Solutes, and Solvents

5. Solutions, Solutes, and Solvents

Oh no! Your friend Ben just drank chili oil on a dare, and now his mouth is burning. Should he drink the ice water or vegetable oil to cool his mouth? Quick. Watch this lesson if you aren't sure.

Acids and Bases

6. Acids and Bases

Have you ever wondered how we measure the acidity of liquids? Check out this lesson to see how acids and bases are measured on a pH scale and how they relate to neutral solutions, such as water.

Introduction to Organic Molecules II: Monomers and Polymers

7. Introduction to Organic Molecules II: Monomers and Polymers

From everyday man-made items like milk jugs and styrofoam to natural proteins and plant materials, the world is full of polymers! Check out this lesson to learn how polymers are constructed on a molecular level.

Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

8. Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are found in many foods that we eat and may be found as sugars, starches, or fiber. Learn more about these three distinct types of carbohydrates, and how they are distinguished through their chemical structures in this lesson.

Structure and Function of Lipids

9. Structure and Function of Lipids

Molecules called lipids have long hydrocarbon chains that determine the way they act. They can be fats, oils, or hormones, and even exist in our cell membranes. Learn more about the chemical structure and biological function of various lipids in this lesson.

Proteins I: Structure and Function

10. Proteins I: Structure and Function

We need our proteins, not just as a major food group but for the many useful roles that they play in our bodies. In our introductory lesson to proteins, you'll learn about the many functions we rely on them to perform.

Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

11. Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

In this lesson, we'll take a deeper look at amino acids. You'll learn what makes a peptide, and what separates a protein from other kinds of amino acid bonds.

Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

12. Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

How do amino acids form the intricate polypeptide chains found in proteins? It's a matter of chemistry. Join glycine, a special amino acid, as she sizes up the other amino acids.

Nucleic Acids: Function & Structure

13. Nucleic Acids: Function & Structure

In this lesson, we will explore what nucleic acids are, including the oozing bodily fluid they were first found in, what makes them unique from other types of biological molecules, and why DNA is called the 'blueprint of life.'

Basic Properties of Chemical Reactions

14. Basic Properties of Chemical Reactions

Learn how about the various components of a chemical reaction, and how those components function. Use this lesson to understand the basic properties of different kinds of chemical reactions.

Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions

15. Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions

Explore a chemical reaction at the molecular level. Learn about exothermic and endothermic reactions, what they look like and what happens when they occur. Understand enthalpy and how you can use it to predict whether a reaction will be exothermic or endothermic.

Activation Energy and Catalysts

16. Activation Energy and Catalysts

Learn how to define activation energy and how it relates to a reaction's energy. Learn what an activated complex is and where it fits into an activation energy diagram. Discover how a catalyst works to change the activation energy of a reaction and what this means to metabolism in the body.

Function of Enzymes: Environmental Effects

17. Function of Enzymes: Environmental Effects

Enzymes appreciate the right working conditions. Can you blame them? We all work best in the correct environment. In this lesson, we'll learn how substrate concentration, temperature, and pH affect enzyme activity and structure.

Function of Enzymes: Substrate, Active Site & Activation Energy

18. Function of Enzymes: Substrate, Active Site & Activation Energy

In this lesson, we'll learn how enzymes function to lower the activation energy of a chemical reaction. Enzymes bind to their substrates to perform all kinds of important and essential cellular processes, as well as processes that help you enjoy a slice of pizza!

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