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Ch 2: Holt Physical Science Chapter 2: The Properties of Matter

About This Chapter

The Properties of Matter chapter of this Holt Physical Science Textbook Companion Course helps students learn essential physical science lessons on the properties of matter. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Properties of Matter textbook chapter.

How it works:

  • Identify the lessons in the Holt Physical Science Properties of Matter chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons within this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the properties of matter topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • Physical and chemical properties of matter
  • Calculating the volumes of basic shapes
  • Differences and calculations of mass and weight
  • Distinguishing between inertia and mass

Holt is a registered trademark of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

9 Lessons in Chapter 2: Holt Physical Science Chapter 2: The Properties of Matter
Matter: Physical and Chemical Properties

1. Matter: Physical and Chemical Properties

How are substances identified? There are two major ways we can describe a substance: physical properties and chemical properties. Learn about how chemists use properties to classify matter as either a mixture or a pure substance.

How to Measure Liquid Volume

2. How to Measure Liquid Volume

There are many tools for measuring liquid volume. The tool you use will depend on how much liquid you have to measure and how precise you need to be. Learn how graduated cylinders and burets are used to get accurate liquid volume measurements.

What Is a Meniscus? - Definition, Uses & Lab Examples

3. What Is a Meniscus? - Definition, Uses & Lab Examples

Liquids can be tricky to measure because surface tension causes them to do interesting things like forming a meniscus. In this video lesson you'll learn what a meniscus is, why it forms, and how to correctly read the volume of a liquid using the meniscus at the surface.

How to Calculate the Volumes of Basic Shapes

4. How to Calculate the Volumes of Basic Shapes

Squares pegs = square holes. Triangular pegs = triangular holes. But where does a sphere go? In this lesson, review volumes of common shapes while contrasting a sphere and a cylinder - after all, they both go into the circular hole... right?

Using Displacement to Calculate the Volume of an Object

5. Using Displacement to Calculate the Volume of an Object

Determining the volume of an object is easy if that object is uniform and has a regular shape. For objects that are irregularly shaped, using the edges is not so straightforward, so instead we can measure the volume by displacement.

Mass and Weight: Differences and Calculations

6. Mass and Weight: Differences and Calculations

We often talk about mass and weight as if they are the same. While they are proportional to each other, they are not in fact the same. In this video lesson you will learn to distinguish between the two, as well as convert one to the other.

Distinguishing Between Inertia and Mass

7. Distinguishing Between Inertia and Mass

Mass and inertia are both related to the amount of matter an object has, but they aren't exactly the same thing. In this video lesson, you'll see how mass affects an object's inertia, which in turn affects that object's motion.

States of Matter and Chemical Versus Physical Changes to Matter

8. States of Matter and Chemical Versus Physical Changes to Matter

The world around us is constantly changing. Chemists put those changes into two main categories: physical changes and chemical changes. This lesson will define and provide examples of each.

Comparing Reversible & Irreversible Physical & Chemical Changes

9. Comparing Reversible & Irreversible Physical & Chemical Changes

A substance that changes form has undergone a physical change, which might be reversible. A substance that transforms into a different substance has undergone a chemical change, which is harder to reverse. Learn about reversible and irreversible changes.

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