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Ch 4: Interest Groups and American Democracy

About This Chapter

Watch online political science video lessons and learn about interest groups' history, development and political influence. Take quizzes to verify your understanding of the material.

Interest Groups and American Democracy - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Instructors teaching this chapter's video lessons can help you examine the political influence wielded by interest groups and the steps taken to regulate their activities. You can also learn how they serve public or private interests and scrutinize the techniques used to change government policy and sway public opinion. This chapter can teach you how to:

  • Provide examples of different types of interest groups
  • Outline interest groups' historical development
  • Explain the free rider problem and pluralist theory
  • Discuss interest groups' political influence

Video Objective
The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress Describe the Tea Act and the Boston Tea Party as well as the Intolerable Acts and the First Continental Congress.
What are Interest Groups in the United States? - Definition, History, Types & Examples Examine the nature of interest groups. Explain their prevalence in U.S. politics.
Development & Maintenance of Interest Groups: Lesson & Quiz Learn how interest groups are formed and maintained as well as why people join them. Assess strategies for avoiding the free rider problem.
Strategies & Influence of Interest Groups on American Politics: Lesson & Quiz Outline tactics interest groups use to influence public policy. Describe forms of government regulation used to limit the influence of interest groups.
Pluralist View of Interest Groups on American Politics: Lesson & Quiz Learn how pluralist theory explains the role of interest groups in American politics.

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