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Ch 7: Minerals in Nutrition

About This Chapter

Watch minerals in nutrition video lessons and find out about mineral classifications, where minerals are found, common health issues associated with these nutrients and much more. Each lesson is accompanied by a short multiple-choice quiz to help check your understanding of these nutrition topics.

Minerals in Nutrition - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

The various types of minerals and their importance in the body are discussed in this chapter, which offers lessons on major and trace minerals, health effects related to minerals and sources of these nutrients. The professional instructors leading these courses will introduce you to electrolytes, magnesium, sulfur, zinc, iodine and other minerals. This chapter is designed to teach you about:

  • How minerals are classified
  • Conditions that affect the body's ability to absorb and retain minerals
  • Food sources for minerals
  • Key functions of minerals
  • Benefits of mineral supplements

Video Objectives
Classification of Minerals: Major & Trace Describe the two primary classifications for minerals. List minerals associated with each classification. Discuss sodium, phosphorus, potassium, manganese, fluoride and more.
Influences on the Absorption, Retention, & Availability of Minerals in the Body Examine body conditions and dietary factors that play a role in the absorption and retention of minerals in the body. Evaluate conditions that impact availability of certain minerals.
Minerals in Our Food: Functions in the Body & Food Sources Present a list of key functions that minerals perform in human bodies. Describe which foods are sources of major and trace minerals.
Common Health Effects Associated with Minerals Assess how minerals play a role in your overall health. Explain how minerals affect blood pressure. Summarize the relationship between minerals and osteoporosis, iron deficiency, anemia and iodine deficiency.
Mineral Supplements: Benefits and Risks Detail the various benefits associated with mineral supplements. Outline the risks of taking mineral supplements.

5 Lessons in Chapter 7: Minerals in Nutrition
Classification of Minerals: Major & Trace

1. Classification of Minerals: Major & Trace

Minerals are needed for good health. Major minerals include sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and sulfur. Trace minerals include iron, zinc, iodine, copper, manganese, fluoride, selenium, chromium and molybdenum. Learn about both major and trace minerals in this lesson.

Influences on the Absorption, Retention, & Availability of Minerals in the Body

2. Influences on the Absorption, Retention, & Availability of Minerals in the Body

Minerals are inorganic compounds needed by your body. The degree to which minerals can be absorbed, retained and made available depends on factors such as different components of your diet and your body's need for the mineral.

Minerals in Our Food: Functions in the Body & Food Sources

3. Minerals in Our Food: Functions in the Body & Food Sources

Minerals are important substances that help your body's form and function on many different levels. This lesson will go over some important ones, what they do, and where they are found in our diets.

Common Health Effects Associated with Minerals

4. Common Health Effects Associated with Minerals

Minerals are inorganic compounds needed by your body. Learn about common health effects associated with the imbalance of certain minerals such as high blood pressure, osteoporosis, dental caries, iron deficiency anemia and goiters.

Mineral Supplements: Benefits and Risks

5. Mineral Supplements: Benefits and Risks

Mineral supplements can be used to add nutritional value to your diet. Learn about groups of people who may benefit from taking mineral supplements and the potential risks that could develop from adding supplements to your diet.

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