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Ch 7: MTEL: Analyzing Ideas in a Text

About This Chapter

Sharpen your literary analysis skills in this MTEL Communication and Literary Skills exam preparation chapter. Complete the multiple-choice quizzes that accompany the lessons to measure your progress.

MTEL: Analyzing Ideas in a Text - Chapter Summary

If you're looking for a place to review methods for picking apart the elements of a text to gain a deeper understanding of its arguments and meaning, this is the place to be. Here we help you ready yourself for the Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL) Communication and Literacy Skills exam with entertaining videos describing how to analyze various aspects of a text. These lessons explain how to:

  • Evaluate cause and effect
  • Determine sequence of events and steps
  • Compare/contrast portions of a text
  • Analyze related and opposing arguments
  • Identify problems and solutions in texts
  • Draw conclusions from a passage
  • Use deductive and inductive reasoning
  • Analyze plot and theme

Our instructors provide engaging, upbeat lessons with fun graphics and anecdotes to help cement these concepts in your memory before the big test. Follow-up on the video lessons by reviewing the lesson transcripts and taking the self-assessments. Follow along with the given lesson order or jump around to topics you know you need to review.

MTEL: Analyzing Ideas in a Text - Chapter Objectives

The MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills exam is administered in two parts: a reading subtest and a writing subtest. You can take the two subtests together in one four-hour testing session or just take one subtest at a time, which costs more but still allows for a four-hour testing window. The material presented here fits mostly within the Relationship Among Ideas subarea, which accounts for 16.7% of the reading subtest material with 6-8 multiple-choice questions. To pass the exam you will need to achieve a score of 240 or higher in each subtest.

The MTEL website is where you will go to register. There you will find more information on testing dates/locations, when to expect your score report, and what to do on test day. Don't forget to return to these lessons as your test day approaches to keep your memory fresh.

10 Lessons in Chapter 7: MTEL: Analyzing Ideas in a Text
How to Determine the Cause and Effect of an Event in a Passage

1. How to Determine the Cause and Effect of an Event in a Passage

Recognize and understand how cause and effect relates to literature. Learn how to determine and find cause and effect in a reading passage, along with a strategy to assist you.

Determining the Sequence of Events or Steps in a Reading Selection

2. Determining the Sequence of Events or Steps in a Reading Selection

News articles or other types of informational texts can be structured through a sequence of events or steps. In this lesson, we will examine how that is done and how to identify this structure.

How to Compare and Contrast Elements of a Passage

3. How to Compare and Contrast Elements of a Passage

In this lesson, you'll learn how to compare and contrast when analyzing pieces of literature. You will also learn different strategies to assist in identifying key similarities and differences when applying compare and contrast.

How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

4. How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze two texts related by theme or topic. We will discuss how to analyze the texts individually and then how to synthesize their information.

How to Analyze Two Texts with Opposing Arguments

5. How to Analyze Two Texts with Opposing Arguments

In this lesson, we'll discuss how to analyze two texts that present opposing arguments. We'll examine arguments based on varying evidence and on varying assumptions.

Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

6. Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

In addition to planning the major argumentative points you'll make when writing a persuasive paper, you should also think about potential opposing views. This video gives you tips for determining how to effectively anticipate and refute opposing views as you write your argument.

How to Identify the Problem and Solution in a Reading Selection

7. How to Identify the Problem and Solution in a Reading Selection

Informational texts can be arranged in a variety of ways. In this lesson, we'll discuss how to identify the problem/solution structure. We will look at key words used and an example that uses this format.

How to Analyze Plot: Steps and Examples

8. How to Analyze Plot: Steps and Examples

In this lesson, we will discuss how to analyze a plot in three basic steps. We will take these three steps and break them down to understand how to analyze a plot by analyzing a fable.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

9. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

The Differences Between Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

10. The Differences Between Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

Inductive and deductive reasoning are often confused. This lesson introduces the concept of reasoning and gives you tips and tricks to keeping inductive and deductive reasoning straight.

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