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Ch 13: MTEL: Analyzing & Revising Sentences

About This Chapter

Jump into the videos and texts in this chapter for a review of how to identify and correct mistakes in sentence structure, clarity, and style. Be sure to take the quizzes after each lesson and the chapter test at the end to help you prepare for the MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills exam.

MTEL: Analyzing & Revising Sentences - Chapter Summary

We make getting ready for the Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL) Communication and Literacy Skills test simple and convenient in this chapter on revising sentences. Here, we help you dust off all that old information about fragments, agreement, and tense, so you can identify and correct the mistakes presented on the test. The entertaining videos and texts provide lessons on:

  • Writing logical sentences and revising faulty ones
  • Drafting clear sentences
  • Avoiding mixed structure sentences and fragments
  • Identifying errors of verb tense, agreement, and parallelism
  • Creating concise copy for technical writing

Each lesson is brought to you by an experienced instructor and is presented in an upbeat style with a healthy dose of humor and fun graphics. After the lesson you have several aids to assist in your studies: review and/or print out the transcript and worksheet, take the assessments to see how you're doing, and/or use the intuitive navigation tools to jump back to trouble spots.

MTEL: Analyzing & Revising Sentences Chapter Objectives

There are two subtests on the MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills exam: a test of your reading comprehension and analysis, and an evaluation of your writing and revising skills. Take the two subtests together or separately. The material in this chapter addresses the writing subtest which includes 35 multiple-choice questions, seven sentences to correct, and two open-response items. Understanding how to craft and revise sentences will be a critical skill.

To review test dates, register for the test, and see the schedule for score reporting, go to the MTEL website. Your score report will be made available to you, the State of Massachusetts, and your specific education institution. To pass the exam and obtain licensure you must score a 240 or higher.

12 Lessons in Chapter 13: MTEL: Analyzing & Revising Sentences
Writing Revision: How to Fix Mistakes in Your Writing

1. Writing Revision: How to Fix Mistakes in Your Writing

Writing is an important skill, but revising your writing is also. In this lesson, learn the basics of self-editing, including editing for content and for mechanics, such as grammar and misspellings.

Faulty Sentence: Definition & Examples

2. Faulty Sentence: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will examine the faulty sentence. A sentence may be faulty for several reasons, and we will take a look at the most common mistakes people make when constructing sentences.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

3. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

Your sentences may not always make as much sense as you think they do, especially if you're comparing two or more things. It's easy to let comparisons become illogical, incomplete, or ambiguous. Learn how to avoid making faulty comparisons on your way to writing a great essay.

Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

4. Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

Just because you know a good sentence when you read one doesn't mean that you think it's easy to put one together - forget about writing an essay's worth. Learn how to write clear sentences and turn rough ones into gems.

Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

5. Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

A mixed structure sentence is a common error that occurs when a writer starts a sentence with one structure but switches to a different structure in the middle of the sentence. This video will teach you how to spot and avoid this type of error.

What is a Sentence Fragment? - Definition & Examples

6. What is a Sentence Fragment? - Definition & Examples

Find out what sentence fragments are and how to correct them. Learn the different ways sentence fragments can happen and how they relate to phrases as well as dependent and independent clauses.

How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

7. How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

Developing a good writing style starts with developing good diction. You can't craft an essay or story the way you want without being able to choose the right words first. Here's how.

Identifying Errors of Verb Tense

8. Identifying Errors of Verb Tense

In order to identify verb tense errors, you'll need to learn about the six verb tenses and how they differ. Once you know how to look for them, problematic shifts in verb tenses can be spotted and avoided easily.

Simplifying for Conciseness in Technical Communication

9. Simplifying for Conciseness in Technical Communication

Documents that are long and wordy are difficult to comprehend and often end up not being read completely through. This video provides strategies for keeping technical documents concise.

Revising Your Message for Errors, Conciseness & Readability

10. Revising Your Message for Errors, Conciseness & Readability

The three parts of producing a message are planning, writing, and completing. In the completing stage, it is crucial for business writers to examine their message for errors, conciseness, and readability.

Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

11. Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

A common error occurs whenever a writer uses wording that suggests that a lot of people own or use just one thing, when really they all own or use their own separate things. This video will explain how to identify and fix this type of error.

Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

12. Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

Sentences that aren't parallel sound funny, even if they look perfectly correct at first glance. Learn what makes a sentence parallel, how to revise a sentence to make it parallel, and how to write beautiful, balanced sentences of your own.

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