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Ch 21: Protests, Activism and Civil Disobedience: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Protests, Activism and Civil Disobedience chapter of this High School U.S. History Help and Review course is the simplest way to master the history of late 20th century activist movements. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of protests, activism and civil disobedience.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering high school U.S. history material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn high school U.S. history. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the objectives of activist movements taking shape in the 50s, 60s and 70s
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning history (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about late 20th century activism
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra history learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Protests, Activism and Civil Disobedience chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Protests, Activism and Civil Disobedience chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any late 20th century activism question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a protests, activism and civil disobedience unit of a standard high school U.S. history course. Topics covered include:

  • The Great Society program and President Lyndon B. Johnson
  • The civil rights movement during the 50s and 60s
  • The origin and legacy of 60s counterculture
  • The student movement of the 60s
  • Causes and impacts of the women's movement
  • Native American and Mexican American activist movements
  • The gay liberation and environmental movements of the 60s and 70s

10 Lessons in Chapter 21: Protests, Activism and Civil Disobedience: Help and Review
President Lyndon B. Johnson and the Great Society Program

1. President Lyndon B. Johnson and the Great Society Program

The Great Society was an ambitious legislative program which attempted to eliminate poverty and racial inequity within the United States. Learn about the creation of the program, its endeavors and its ultimate legacy.

The Civil Rights Movement During the 1950s

2. The Civil Rights Movement During the 1950s

The 1950s witnessed a rejuvenation of the civil rights movement. Learn about the transformation of the movement, its important events and the impact it had on the 1960s.

The Civil Rights Movement During the 1960s

3. The Civil Rights Movement During the 1960s

The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s was an extension of the progress made during the 1950s. Learn about the movement's landmark achievements, its fracturing and its legacies.

Hippies and the Counterculture: Origins, Beliefs and Legacy

4. Hippies and the Counterculture: Origins, Beliefs and Legacy

The 1960s were a period of tension and turbulence for much of the U.S. The counterculture attempted to promote an alternative lifestyle that encouraged peace, love and freedom. Learn more about its origins, beliefs and legacy.

The Student Movement of the 1960s

5. The Student Movement of the 1960s

The societal disillusion felt by the younger generation of the 1950s was translated into a massive student movement during the 1960s. Learn about the formation of the movement, its campaigns and its inevitable end.

1968: The Year that Changed the Nation

6. 1968: The Year that Changed the Nation

The year of 1968 was a year of war in Southeast Asia, domestic clashes over racial equality and war and fallen leaders, including Dr. King and Robert Kennedy. Learn more about the year that changed the nation in this video lesson.

The Women's Movement: Causes, Campaigns & Impacts on the US

7. The Women's Movement: Causes, Campaigns & Impacts on the US

The women's movement of the 1960s ushered in a new wave of feminism that sought to address the national issues of gender. Learn about the movement, its leaders and the ultimate outcome for women in the United States.

Other Important Activist Movements of the Late 60s and Early 70s

8. Other Important Activist Movements of the Late 60s and Early 70s

The 1960s represented a decade of dissent in America. While there were large social campaigns throughout the nation, the goal of this lesson is to recognize smaller activist movements involving Native Americans, Mexican Americans, and the environment.

The Black Power Movement: Facts, Timeline & Leaders

9. The Black Power Movement: Facts, Timeline & Leaders

This lesson will place the Black Power Movement in context and detail some of its basic features. The most important organizations will be detailed and the contemporary relevance of the Black Power Movement will be discussed.

The Freedom Riders: Timeline, Summary & Facts

10. The Freedom Riders: Timeline, Summary & Facts

In this lesson, we will discuss the Freedom Riders, an interracial group of blacks and whites who sought to desegregate America's public bus transportation system in the summer of 1961. After the lesson, test your understanding with a quick quiz.

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