Login
Copyright

Ch 4: SAT Subject Test Literature: Literary Genres

About This Chapter

Review the forms literature can take, from nonfiction styles to myths and folklore, to prepare you for the SAT subject exam in literature. Video lessons and quizzes incorporate all of the elements of this section in a simple and clear manner.

SAT Literature: Literary Genres - Chapter Summary

Genre simply means type, class, or category of a literary work, and knowing the genre of a particular work or excerpt can give you many clues about the writer's intentions and, therefore, his or her meaning. Use our video lessons to help you understand a wide variety of genres, from nonfiction essays to parodies. This chapter includes the following lessons:

  • Literary Forms and Genres: How They Affect Meaning
  • Native American Oral Tradition: Heritage and Literary Influence
  • Types of Fiction: Novels, Novellas & Short Stories
  • The Fable, Folktale, Myth, and Legend: Differences and Examples
  • Non-Fiction
  • Epistolary Writing: Letter and Diary Forms
  • Satire, Parody, or Spoof: Types of Humorous Writing

These lessons will introduce you to genres you may not have studied yet as well as the more familiar ones, including the vocabulary associated with them. The lessons are broken down into short, digestible bites so you don't get overwhelmed, and brief quizzes come after each lesson, so you can test yourself.

SAT Literature Objectives

You'll benefit from taking the SAT literature test in several ways, from showcasing your English-language knowledge for college applications to preparing for material you'll study in depth when you get to college to demonstrating skills you've picked up outside the classroom. The exam focuses on what high schools commonly teach, but don't worry if you're not already familiar with all the excerpts you'll read on the test. If you're armed with good reading comprehension skills and knowledge about the parts of literature, you're well prepared.

You'll answer questions about 6-8 sets of passages. Genres represented on the exam include drama/plays (about ten percent of the exam), prose including essays and fiction (40%-50% of the exam), and poetry (the other 40%-50%). The exam consists of approximately 60 multiple-choice questions - the same types of questions you'll practice in each lesson module.

6 Lessons in Chapter 4: SAT Subject Test Literature: Literary Genres
Native American Oral Tradition: Heritage and Literary Influence

1. Native American Oral Tradition: Heritage and Literary Influence

Native American nations have a rich oral tradition of storytelling. In this lesson, we'll explore the heritage and themes of American Indian stories and look at how they influenced later American literature.

Types of Fiction: Novels, Novellas & Short Stories

2. Types of Fiction: Novels, Novellas & Short Stories

Learn how fiction is organized by length into three categories: novels, novellas and short stories. Explore the general characteristics of each type, and learn about some famous examples.

The Fable, Folktale, Myth, Legend: Differences and Examples

3. The Fable, Folktale, Myth, Legend: Differences and Examples

In this lesson, learn about fables, folktales, myths and legends, stories that entertain and serve instructive or educational purposes. Discover how these types of stories differ from one another and about their prevalence throughout the world.

Non-Fiction as Literary Form: Definition and Examples

4. Non-Fiction as Literary Form: Definition and Examples

Although non-fiction might seem fairly straightforward, there are quite a few different genres within non-fiction that are easy to confuse. With this in mind, we'll consider the similarities and differences between biographies, autobiographies and memoirs, essays, and journalism.

Epistolary Writing: Letter and Diary Forms

5. Epistolary Writing: Letter and Diary Forms

In this lesson, you will discover that prose writing can take on different formats, from letters and diary entries to newspaper clippings and interviews. Explore how writers of both non-fiction and fiction tell stories through these different forms.

Satire, Parody, or Spoof: Types of Humorous Writing

6. Satire, Parody, or Spoof: Types of Humorous Writing

Learn about how writers use satire, parody and spoof to make their readers laugh and think. Explore how these forms mock the conventions of specific literary works and genres.

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 95 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 2,000 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support