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Ch 5: SAT Subject Test Literature: Poetry Terms & Types

About This Chapter

Review elements of English poetry to prep for the SAT Literature Subject Test. Lessons in this chapter offer a review of literary terms and types of poetry. Check your understanding with lesson quizzes and a chapter exam.

SAT Literature: Poetry Terms and Types - Chapter Summary

Don't get tripped up on the difference between metered verse and blank verse or between an ode and a sonnet. Use Study.com's easy-to-understand video lessons to help you understand the poetry topics and vocabulary you'll need to do your best on the SAT literature exam. Lesson in this chapter will cover the following:

  • Glossary of Literary Terms: Poetry
  • Blank Verse
  • Narrative Poems
  • Lyric Poetry: Odes, Sonnets, The Elegy

The lessons in this chapter help you understand the different kinds of poetry using examples from literature. Lessons are broken down into short segments that you can make sure you understand one before moving on to the next one. As you finish each lesson, you'll have to chance to take a self-assessment quiz to test yourself on what you've learned.

SAT Literature Objectives

You might take the SAT subject test in literature for several reasons: to showcase your interest and skills in literature on your college applications, to show achievement in the English language if you're a native speaker of another language, or because you're a home-schooled student who wants to compare her knowledge to that of other students at his or her grade level. The test gives you the opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge of U.S. and English literature, as well as literature in English from other parts of the world, from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

Whatever the reason you choose to take the SAT subject exam in literature, you'll need to know poetry, which covers 40%-50% of the exam. Another 40%-50% pertains to prose passages, including excerpts from essays and fiction; the final possible ten percent covers drama and other literary topics. In all, there are approximately 60 multiple-choice questions. You'll read 6-8 texts generally reflecting what's commonly taught in high schools, each followed by a series of questions about it.

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