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Ch 12: SAT Writing: How to Write An Argument

About This Chapter

Discover strategies for writing an effective argument through the online video lessons in this chapter. Develop your abilities in this area so that you can give a strong performance on the writing portion of the SAT examination.

SAT Writing - How to Write an Argument - Chapter Summary

This chapter aims to teach you to structure an essay argument and it emphasizes the importance of providing strong evidence to support it. Watch each of the tutorial videos, which highlight logical fallacies and broad generalizations as well as the use of rhetorical skills. Apply what you've learned during the writing section of the SAT examination. Allow the video lessons to help you with:

  • Creating good premises and conclusions
  • Identifying the steps necessary for writing and structuring a good argument
  • Organizing your major points
  • Developing rhetorical skills for use in persuasive essays
  • Appealing to an audience through pathos, ethos and logos
  • Avoiding logical fallacies
  • Anticipating and refuting opposing viewpoints

As you get ready to take the writing section of the SAT examination, review concepts that you may have forgotten through the course of the school year, or learn information that is new to you. Each of the short video lessons in this chapter can be viewed online via your mobile technology. Seasoned instructors use conversational language to make the learning process fun and easy. The dashboard area can be accessed by clicking the icon in the upper-right corner of the screen. It will show your recent activities as well as links to additional courses and an ask-an-expert feature.

SAT Writing - How to Write an Argument Objectives

Your ability to write a strong argument will be assessed during the writing portion of the SAT examination, which also includes critical reading and mathematics sections. In fact, you'll be required to develop a particular point of view and use reasoning techniques to support your stance. There are 44 questions on the Writing and Language examination and you'll be granted 35 minutes to finish them all. There's just one optional essay question, and you'll be allowed up to 50 minutes to complete it. You'll need a No. 2 pencil to write the essay question in longhand.

7 Lessons in Chapter 12: SAT Writing: How to Write An Argument
Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

1. Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

In this lesson, consider examples of an argument, as the term is understood in philosophy. You'll learn how to create appropriate premises and how this influences how likely it is for a listener to accept your conclusion.

How to Write a Great Argument

2. How to Write a Great Argument

Many times our writing must not just be informative but it must also be persuasive. One of the best ways to be very persuasive is to use a great argument. Learn six steps you can follow to write a great argument.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

3. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

When you write a persuasive essay, it's important to think about how you'll construct your argument, from how you'll arrange your major points to how and where you'll refute opposing views. This video covers some of the basics for structuring an argument.

Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

4. Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

In this video, you will explore the basics of identifying your purpose and audience and learn how to use effective rhetorical skills in your persuasive writing.

Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

5. Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

Appeal is an important aspect to writing, especially when your goal is to inform and/or persuade the reader in some area. In this lesson, we will examine the three main types of appeal: logos, ethos and pathos

What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

6. What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

Logical fallacies are flaws in reasoning that can throw your argument off track and confuse your reader. This video explains how to identify a few common logical fallacies and how to steer clear of them.

Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

7. Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

In addition to planning the major argumentative points you'll make when writing a persuasive paper, you should also think about potential opposing views. This video gives you tips for determining how to effectively anticipate and refute opposing views as you write your argument.

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