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Ch 3: The Parts of Cells - Middle School Life Science: Homeschool Curriculum

About This Chapter

The Parts of Cells unit of this Middle School Life Science Homeschool course is designed to help homeschooled students learn about the components of common cells. Parents can use the short videos to introduce topics, break up lessons and keep students engaged.

Who's it for?

This unit of our Middle School Life Science Homeschool course will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the different divisions of plant and animal cells. There is no faster or easier way to learn about parts of a cell. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who require an efficient, self-paced course of study to learn about nuclear pores, viruses, chlorophyll, grana and mitochondria.
  • Homeschool parents looking to spend less time preparing lessons and more time teaching.
  • Homeschool parents who need a life science curriculum that appeals to multiple learning types (visual or auditory).
  • Gifted students and students with learning differences.

How it works:

  • Students watch a short, fun video lesson that covers a specific unit topic.
  • Students and parents can refer to the video transcripts to reinforce learning.
  • Short quizzes and a Parts of Cells unit exam confirm understanding or identify any topics that require review.

The Parts of Cells Unit Objectives:

  • Review what the internal structure of a cell consists of.
  • Learn the differences between active and passive transport processes.
  • Discover how osmosis, saturation and diffusion occur across a membrane.
  • Compare the transport of materials by endocytosis and exocytosis.
  • Study the layers of the cellular nucleus.
  • Understand the function of mitochondria.
  • Examine chloroplasts and their role in feeding plants.
  • Explore cellular walls and the largest part of a plant cell: the central vacuole.
  • Read about similarities and differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • Learn about two viruses that can kill cells.

5 Lessons in Chapter 3: The Parts of Cells - Middle School Life Science: Homeschool Curriculum
Endocytosis and Exocytosis Across the Cell Membrane

1. Endocytosis and Exocytosis Across the Cell Membrane

In this lesson, we'll discover how some cells can eat, drink, and digest their dinner through the process of endocytosis and a structure called the lysosome. In addition, we'll learn how a cell can throw out the leftovers across the cell membrane during exocytosis.

Chloroplast Structure: Chlorophyll, Stroma, Thylakoid, and Grana

2. Chloroplast Structure: Chlorophyll, Stroma, Thylakoid, and Grana

In this lesson, we'll explore the parts of the chloroplast, such as the thylakoids and stroma, that make a chloroplast the perfect place for conducting photosynthesis in plant cells.

Plant Cell Structures: The Cell Wall and Central Vacuole

3. Plant Cell Structures: The Cell Wall and Central Vacuole

In this lesson, we'll talk about some of the things that make plant cells so different from our cells. In addition to being mean, green photosynthesizing machines, plant cells have cell walls and central vacuoles to make them unique!

Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells: Similarities and Differences

4. Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells: Similarities and Differences

In this lesson, we discuss the similarities and differences between the eukaryotic cells of your body and prokaryotic cells such as bacteria. Eukaryotes organize different functions within specialized membrane-bound compartments called organelles. These structures do not exist in prokaryotes.

Viruses: Bacteriophage Lytic and Lysogenic Cycles

5. Viruses: Bacteriophage Lytic and Lysogenic Cycles

Viruses are generally not only our enemy but also the enemy of many other organisms. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect specific bacteria. In this lesson, we'll discuss their basic structure and infection cycle.

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the Middle School Life Science: Homeschool Curriculum course

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