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Ch 15: U.S. History (1866-1969)

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Study U.S. history from 1866 to 1969 as you prepare for the Illinois Licensure Testing Systems (ILTS) Social Science: Psychology exam. Make studying easier - watch video lessons and take self-assessment quizzes.

ILTS Social Science Psychology - U.S. History (1866-1969) - Chapter Summary

With the following online lessons, you can refresh and add to your knowledge of the social science topics covered by the exam, including U.S. history from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries. Video instructors talk you through all the key events, important figures, and the vocabulary to make each lesson easy to understand and remember. Lessons in this chapter include:

  • Reconstruction period: goals, success and failures
  • American industry development in the Gilded Age: Bessemer process, scientific management, and new business models
  • Gilded Age politics: political machines and civil service reform
  • Labor unions during the second Industrial Revolution: organized labor vs. management
  • Immigration in industrial America and the rise of nativism
  • Progressive politics: definition, reforms, and amendments
  • Women's suffrage and early feminism: movement, 19th Amendment, and leaders
  • American imperialism: definition, reasons, and rising international power
  • The United States in World War I: official position, isolation, and intervention
  • American politics in the 1920s: transition, corruption, and the Teapot Dome scandal
  • The Great Depression: the Wall Street crash of 1929 and other causes
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt and the first New Deal: the first 100 days
  • The Second New Deal: Social Programs and their Resistance
  • The attack on Pearl Harbor: the beginning of American involvement in World War II
  • McCarthyism and the Red Scare: definition, causes, and effects
  • The civil rights movement during the 1950s
  • The civil rights movement during the 1960s
  • The student movement of the 1960s
  • The women's movement: causes, campaigns, and impacts on the U.S.
  • 1968: the year that changed the nation
  • Other important activist movements of the late '60s and early '70s

ILTS Social Science Psychology: Objectives

The Illinois Licensure Testing Systems (ILTS) Social Science: Psychology exam is used to determine your readiness for licensing in your subject. The exam includes core objectives that measure your knowledge of the social science field in general. The eight objectives of the social science exams are for you to:

  1. Recognize the interpretive and comparative natures of the study of history
  2. Recognize terms and concepts related to human developmental theory
  3. Understand the basic methods and tools of social science inquiry
  4. Understand the use of analysis, evaluation, and interpretation in a social science context
  5. Understand basic political concepts, including the political structures at the state, local, and national levels within the U.S.
  6. Demonstrate basic understanding of cultural and political geography
  7. Understand basic U.S. and world economy concepts
  8. Understand terms related to the study of cultures, the structures of human societies, and the interactions between cultures

On the Psychology exam, you'll earn a score of 100-300. To apply for licensing in your subject, you'll need to earn at least a 240. On the exam, you'll answer 125 questions, all in multiple-choice format.

Each video lesson includes a multiple-choice self-assessment quiz. Use the quizzes to judge how well you remember the material as you go. You'll also get experience answering questions similar to those found on the exam.

21 Lessons in Chapter 15: U.S. History (1866-1969)
Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

1. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

Reconstruction of the South following the American Civil War lasted from 1865-1877 under three presidents. It wasn't welcomed by Southerners, and there were many problems throughout this process. But, was it successful?

American Industry Development in the Gilded Age: Bessemer Process, Scientific Management & New Business Models

2. American Industry Development in the Gilded Age: Bessemer Process, Scientific Management & New Business Models

American industry was transformed in the Second Industrial Revolution but not just through mechanization. Find out how new methods of management and organization helped the development of big business.

Gilded Age Politics: Political Machines & Civil Service Reform

3. Gilded Age Politics: Political Machines & Civil Service Reform

Refresh your memory of the 'Forgotten Presidents' of the Gilded Age, and learn how Civil Service Reform might have cleaned up the federal government, but not the cities and states. They were the domain of political machines, like Tammany Hall.

Labor Unions During the Second Industrial Revolution: Organized Labor vs. Management

4. Labor Unions During the Second Industrial Revolution: Organized Labor vs. Management

Before American businesses had to comply with basic labor laws and safety regulations, workers organized to improve their working conditions. Learn about the early labor unions and their violent clashes with management and government.

Immigration in Industrial America and the Rise of Nativism

5. Immigration in Industrial America and the Rise of Nativism

Between the Civil War and WWI, America experienced a massive third wave of immigration. Learn about where these immigrants came from, where they went and how 'native' Americans responded to them.

Progressive Politics: Definition, Reforms & Amendments

6. Progressive Politics: Definition, Reforms & Amendments

During the Progressive Era, from around 1900-1917, political reformers pushed for an end of abuse of power in politics and government. Learn how political reforms of the Progressive Era helped make government more responsive to the people, prompting changes at every level of government.

Women's Suffrage & Early Feminism: Movement, 19th Amendment & Leaders

7. Women's Suffrage & Early Feminism: Movement, 19th Amendment & Leaders

The women's suffrage movement became one of the most prominent areas of reform during the Progressive movement. Learn about the work of early feminists, changing roles of women and notable women suffrage leaders who pushed for women's right to vote.

American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

8. American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

When George Washington left office, he warned against getting drawn into global issues, yet just over 100 years later, the U.S. began its rise to become the dominant world power. What started this rise of American Imperialism?

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

9. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

American Politics in the 1920s: Transition, Corruption & the Teapot Dome Scandal

10. American Politics in the 1920s: Transition, Corruption & the Teapot Dome Scandal

Americans looked forward to the start of a new decade in 1920. They also looked for a president that would ease their fears and return the nation to 'normal,' but big business and corruption would come to symbolize politics of the decade.

The Great Depression: The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and Other Causes

11. The Great Depression: The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and Other Causes

October 29, 1929, marked the beginning of the Great Depression in the United States. Learn about this event, including the factors that contributed to the collapse of the American economy.

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the First New Deal: The First 100 Days

12. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the First New Deal: The First 100 Days

President Franklin Roosevelt's first New Deal program represented an aggressive legislative campaign to relieve American suffering and end the Great Depression. Learn more about the first 100 days of the New Deal.

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Second New Deal

13. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Second New Deal

President Franklin Roosevelt's second New Deal represented a more conservative approach to battling the Great Depression. Learn more about the program, including its legislation and legacy.

The Attack on Pearl Harbor: The Beginning of American Involvement in World War II

14. The Attack on Pearl Harbor: The Beginning of American Involvement in World War II

On December 7, 1941, the Empire of Japan launched a surprise attack against Allied possessions in the Pacific, including the American military base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. After decades of conflict between the two nations, the U.S. declared war.

McCarthyism and the Red Scare: Definition, Causes & Effects

15. McCarthyism and the Red Scare: Definition, Causes & Effects

The fear of communism, known as the Red Scare, led to a national witch hunt for suspected communist supporters, which was known as McCarthyism. Learn about the rise of McCarthyism and the Red Scare, the impact of McCarthyism on American society and the legacy of the short-lived fear campaign.

The Civil Rights Movement During the 1950s

16. The Civil Rights Movement During the 1950s

The 1950s witnessed a rejuvenation of the civil rights movement. Learn about the transformation of the movement, its important events and the impact it had on the 1960s.

The Civil Rights Movement During the 1960s

17. The Civil Rights Movement During the 1960s

The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s was an extension of the progress made during the 1950s. Learn about the movement's landmark achievements, its fracturing and its legacies.

The Student Movement of the 1960s

18. The Student Movement of the 1960s

The societal disillusion felt by the younger generation of the 1950s was translated into a massive student movement during the 1960s. Learn about the formation of the movement, its campaigns and its inevitable end.

The Women's Movement: Causes, Campaigns & Impacts on the US

19. The Women's Movement: Causes, Campaigns & Impacts on the US

The women's movement of the 1960s ushered in a new wave of feminism that sought to address the national issues of gender. Learn about the movement, its leaders and the ultimate outcome for women in the United States.

1968: The Year that Changed the Nation

20. 1968: The Year that Changed the Nation

The year of 1968 was a year of war in Southeast Asia, domestic clashes over racial equality and war and fallen leaders, including Dr. King and Robert Kennedy. Learn more about the year that changed the nation in this video lesson.

Other Important Activist Movements of the Late 60s and Early 70s

21. Other Important Activist Movements of the Late 60s and Early 70s

The 1960s represented a decade of dissent in America. While there were large social campaigns throughout the nation, the goal of this lesson is to recognize smaller activist movements involving Native Americans, Mexican Americans, and the environment.

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