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Be a Certified Executive Housekeeper: Certification and Career Roadmap

Learn how to become a certified executive housekeeper. Research the education requirements, training information, and experience required for starting a career in the hospitality field. View article »

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Video Transcript

Should I Become A Certified Executive Housekeeper?

Executive housekeepers supervise other employees who clean and maintain the rooms in homes, apartments, and hotels. They are generally more experienced and oversee the housekeeping and laundry services in a home or commercial establishment. The executive manages a staff which performs domestic jobs such as washing, dusting, polishing, and generally keeping things clean and neat.

This occupation can be physically demanding, requiring standing for many hours, lifting, and bending. Executive housekeepers must often deal with difficult or undependable workers. They should be skilled not only at housekeeping duties, but also at dealing with people. The median annual salary for executive housekeepers was $40,519 in January 2016, according to PayScale.com.

Career Requirements

Degree Level No degree required; certificate or associate's degree may be necessary for voluntary certification
Experience Varies; housekeeping and supervisory experience typically required
Key Skills Excellent skills in customer service, communication, and multitasking; ability to supervise and manage

Sources: Monster.com job listings (November 2012), International Executive Housekeeping Association (IEHA), Payscale.com (2015 data)

Steps to Become a Certified Executive Housekeeper

Now let's see what steps you'll need to take to become an executive housekeeper.

Step 1: Work as a Housekeeper

Prospective executive housekeepers need to have prior experience. In addition to performing housekeeping tasks, it is important to pay attention to the duties of the executive housekeeper and take note of how they organize and balance scheduling, order supplies, handle paychecks, and ensure that everyone is doing their job. Some employers may also require experience in a supervisory or management position.

Step 2: Pursue Higher Education

Although graduating from high school or earning a degree is not required to become a housekeeper, it may necessary to become certified. Requirements vary by designation, but the Certified Executive Housekeeper (CEH) credential may require completing self-study, an associate's degree, or a certificate program. Specific degree programs designed for executive housekeepers do not exist, but courses that prepare students for this career may be available within hospitality management programs.

Step 3: Advance Your Career by Becoming Certified

In addition to the CEH credential, housekeepers may also consider the Registered Executive Housekeeper (REH) designation. Housekeepers pursing this credential must have a bachelor's degree before they are allowed to include the REH credential in their title.

Keep certification current. To maintain the CEH or REH designation, an executive housekeeper must stay current with any updates in the profession. Every three years, an executive housekeeper must take an examination through the IEHA or complete continuing education hours in order to keep their certification current.

To become an executive housekeeper, you mainly need experience in the field, but if you want to become certified you'll also need to complete a degree program.

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