Recruitment Specialist: Job Description & Requirements

A recruitment specialist often works in the human resources department of companies and is responsible for hiring new workers. Read on to find out how a career in recruiting may be right for you.

Career Definition for a Recruitment Specialist

There are two types of recruitment specialists. One works to fill employment gaps, while the other type of recruitment specialist tries to enlist volunteers and patients for medical studies and trials. The more common recruitment specialist is involved with employment recruiting. This individual networks, cold calls and uses referrals to acquire viable job applicants. Recruitment specialists are responsible for screening, interviewing and placing workers, as well as keeping up to date on local hiring laws and regulations. Recruitment specialists can find work in a variety of areas, including health care, employment services or government agencies.

EducationBachelor's degree
Job SkillsOrganized, detail-oriented, good communication skills, knowledge of computers and hiring laws
Median Salary (2015)$58,350 (for human resource specialists)
Job Growth (2014-2024)5% (for human resource specialists)

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Required Education

Most companies require that a recruitment specialist applicant have a bachelor's degree, and many prefer that the degree be in human resources or a related field. Those companies that do not require a 4-year degree may consider applicants with a combination of education and related experience. Two to three years recruiting experience is preferred, if not required.

Skills Required

The recruitment specialist must be organized and detail-oriented. The individual must have excellent oral and written communication skills. Additionally, computer and Internet proficiency are important. The recruitment specialist must be able to work well independently but must also work as part of a team. Knowledge of hiring laws is vital.

Career and Economic Outlook

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicated that human resources specialists, which includes recruitment specialists, are expected to see 5% growth from 2014 to 2024. In May 2015, the median salary for human resource specialists was $58,350, according to BLS figures. With over 98,000 employees combined, California and Texas were among the states with the highest employment levels of workers in the field (www.bls.gov).

Alternate Career Options

Similar careers to a recruitment specialist include:

Human Resources Manager

Requiring at least a bachelor's degree and some related work experience, this job entails hiring new staff members, planning in conjunction with top executives and providing communication between a business's management and employees. Faster-than-average employment growth of 9% was anticipated by the BLS for human resources managers during the 2014-2024 decade. In 2015, the BLS also reported that their annual median wage was $104,440.

Compensation and Benefits Manager

These managers normally have a minimum of a bachelor's degree, in addition to related work experience. They plan the amount and method concerning employees' pay, in addition to coordinating benefits such as insurance and retirement plans. The BLS revealed an annual median salary of $111,430 for these managers in 2015 and predicted fast as average job growth of 6% from 2014-2024.

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