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Alternative Careers for Electricians

Those interested in working as an electrician often have strong critical-thinking and troubleshooting skills, both of which can be valuable in many careers. Read on to find five similar professions that may appeal to electricians.

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Alternative Career Options for Electricians

Those who wish to pursue a career as an electrician could consider alternative ones in the construction or automotive industries. The options presented below are just several that require strong technical backgrounds.

Job Title Median Salary (2016)* Job Outlook (2014-2024)*
Construction Laborer $33,430 13%
Avionics Technician $60,760 0%
Automotive Service Technician $38,470 (Automotive Service Technician & Mechanic) 5% (Automotive Service Technician & Mechanic)
Heating, Air Conditioning, & Refrigeration Mechanic & Installer $45,910 14%
Solar Photovoltaic Installer $39,240 24%

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Building Inspection
  • Cabinetmaking
  • Carpentry
  • Concrete Finishing
  • Construction Mgmt, General
  • Construction Site Management
  • Drywall Installation
  • Electrical and Power Transmission Installers
  • Electrical Systems Lineworker
  • Electrician
  • Facilities Management
  • Furniture Making
  • Glazier
  • Home Equipment and Furnishings Installer
  • Home Improvement
  • House Painting and Wall Paper
  • Masonry
  • Metal Building Assembly
  • Pipefitting
  • Plumbing Technology
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  • Roofer
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Career Information about Alternative Careers for Electricians

Construction Laborer

Similar to an electrician, a career as a construction laborer requires physical stamina and technical skills. As a construction laborer, you will perform various duties during building and road construction. These duties include setting up construction sites, serving as traffic control during road construction, and using machinery such as jackhammers and surveying equipment. Construction laborers work in a variety of environments and typically receive on-the-job training.

Avionics Technician

Those considering a career as an electrician may also want to consider a job as an avionics technician since they both work with electrical components. Avionics technicians are responsible for ensuring aircraft are in good working condition. They do so by testing onboard instruments, analyzing data to determine any issues, and repairing instruments as needed. Avionics technicians usually work in aerospace product and parts manufacturing and often receive training at an FAA-approved technician school.

Automotive Service Technician

Individuals interested in a profession as an electrician may be interested in working as an automotive service technician because they both focus on identifying problems. As an automotive service technician, you will be responsible for ensuring vehicles operate properly. You will do so by examining vehicles to diagnose any issues, running tests on components and systems, and performing tasks like oil changes and tire rotations. In this career, you will most likely work for a car dealership or privately owned repair shop and will need a postsecondary nondegree award, with most employers requiring certification from the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence upon hire.

Heating, Air Conditioning, & Refrigeration Mechanic & Installer

Like an electrician, heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers, known as HVACR technicians, also work on maintaining and repairing equipment. HVACR technicians specialize in ensuring a building's systems are working properly. They often repair existing systems by diagnosing problems, installing new systems, and performing inspections. HVACR technicians work in commercial and residential buildings and often complete postsecondary training at a technical or trade school, with the option to become certified depending on the type of equipment they use.

Solar Photovoltaic Installer

Those who desire to become an electrician may want to consider becoming a solar photovoltaic installer, as both careers focus on providing buildings with power. As a solar photovoltaic installer, you will specialize in outfitting buildings with solar energy capabilities. Job responsibilities include designing systems based on customers' needs and building specifications and installing and maintaining systems. Solar photovoltaic installers often work for plumbing, heating, and air conditioning contractors and must have at least a high school diploma, with many in the field pursuing training through a trade school or apprenticeship.

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