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Alternative Careers for IT Professionals

Information technology (IT) knowledge is helpful in virtually every industry due to today's rapidly changing technology. The experience and skills required for an IT career can be utilized in many other fields, such as teaching or graphic design.

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Career Alternatives for IT Professionals

Careers working with computers often require strong technical skills and attention to detail. IT professionals interested in other fields will find key highlights, including educational requirements and job outlook, for several options, below.

Job Title Median Salary (2016)* Job Growth (2014-2024)*
Accountant $68,150 (Accountants & Auditors) 11% (Accountants & Auditors)
Technical Writer $69,850 10%
Automotive Service Technician $38,470 (Automotive Service Technicians & Mechanics) 5% (Automotive Service Technicians & Mechanics)
Postsecondary Computer Science Teacher $77,570 9%
Graphic Designer $47,640 1%

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

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Career Information about Alternative Careers for IT Professionals

Accountant

As an accountant, you can capitalize on your analytical skills by ensuring financial records are accurate. You may work for accounting or payroll services firms or government agencies. Job responsibilities will include determining if an organization's financial data is in compliance with current regulations, completing and filing all taxes, and collaborating with an organization's management team to streamline work processes. This career requires at least a bachelor's degree in accounting or a related field.

Technical Writer

You can translate your technical knowledge and experience into a career as a technical writer who creates informational materials, such as journal articles and instruction manuals, for users and organizations. Technical writers identify their audience for the material they create, collaborate with product developers and technical staff to streamline user instructions, and determine the proper channel for dissemination of material. Technical writers may work for technical, scientific, or professional services or as independent consultants. You will need a bachelor's degree to work as a technical writer.

Automotive Service Technician

An IT professional may want to consider a career as an automotive service technician, as many vehicles contain computerized parts, such as brake control or hybrid power. A career as an automotive service technician requires strong technical and problem-solving skills, ones that many IT professionals have. Automotive service technicians work for private repair shops or vehicle dealers and utilize computer equipment to diagnose problems, repair parts as needed, and conduct routine maintenance. You will need a postsecondary nondegree award for this career.

Postsecondary Computer Science Teacher

Those interested in sharing their knowledge and experience in IT may want to consider becoming a postsecondary computer science teacher. As a postsecondary teacher, you can work for a university, college, or professional school. Your job responsibilities will include creating course material and educating students, administering exams and other tests to assess students' understanding of the course, and submitting research for publication in scholarly journals. Postsecondary teachers will need at least a master's degree for the community college level and a Ph.D. for most other educational institutions.

Graphic Designer

As a graphic designer, an IT professional will utilize their technical knowledge to create visual elements of websites. You will do so by tailoring websites to meet clients' needs, utilizing layout and digital illustration programs to bring clients' concepts to life, and designing original artwork, such as logos or images, for clients. Graphic designers usually work for specialized design services firms or advertising and public relations agencies. You will need a bachelor's degree in graphic design or a related field to work as a graphic designer.

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