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Careers Involving Historic Buildings

For individuals who are interested in saving and preserving historic buildings, there are a number of career options that involve this topic. Depending on their skill set and educational background, they are likely to find an option that suits them.

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Career Options Involving Historic Buildings

Many cities and communities have at least one historic building that has played an important role in their history and development. For individuals who have an interest in such buildings, they may be able to turn this interest into a career by pursuing one of the careers listed below. We will discuss five different careers that involve historic buildings and explain how to enter each of these fields.

Job Title Median Salary (2016)* Job Growth (2014-2024)*
Conservator $40,040 (for all museum technicians and conservators) 5% (for all museum technicians and conservators)
Historian $55,110 2%
Construction Manager $89,300 5%
Lawyer $118,160 6%
Fundraiser $54,130 9%

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

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Career Information for Jobs Involving Historic Buildings

Conservator

Many historic buildings are protected by various government and community organizations to preserve them or turn them into museums. A conservator is a type of professional who often works in a museum but could also apply their skills to conserving a historic building in order to minimize its deterioration so it can be around for generations to come. To become a conservator, you will often need a master's degree in a field related to conservation.

Historian

As a historian, you usually will focus on a specific aspect or area of history. Some historians may be particularly interested in historical buildings or architecture, or buildings that played an important role in history. Some of your duties could include collecting data and information about the building, writing materials to be used in articles, museums, or books, and working with other professionals to help preserve historical buildings. To become a historian, you generally need a master's degree.

Construction Manager

As a construction manager who is involved with historic buildings, you may be responsible for maintaining and repairing parts of the building. Because historic buildings are very old by definition and may have been allowed to deteriorate over time, a construction manager who specializes in restoration may also be responsible for figuring out how to best restore a building while staying true to the original design. To become a construction manager, you generally need a bachelor's degree in construction management. Some schools may also offer degrees or specific courses in historic construction preservation.

Lawyer

Lawyers typically specialize in a certain area of the law. With an interest in historic buildings, you could choose to combine your training in the law with helping community groups and organizations fight to save historic buildings. By advocating on behalf of these buildings, you could help other community members understand their value and the need to protect them. To become a lawyer, you will need to complete a 3-year law program and pass the bar exams. Some law programs also allow you to complete a master's program in historic preservation so you are adequately trained in both areas.

Fundraisers

As a fundraiser, you may be employed by a community, civic, or social organization. Many cities and communities have organizations that are dedicated to the preservation of historic buildings. As the fundraiser for such an organization, some of your duties may include developing campaigns and programs, coordinating fundraising efforts, and setting up meetings and phone calls with potential donors to raise money to go towards saving and preserving historic buildings. To become a fundraiser, you will usually need a bachelor's degree, possibly in a field like journalism, communication, or public relations, though a variety of backgrounds may be acceptable.

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