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Jobs for People Who Love People

There are many jobs available for those who love people. Whether you want to manage a team or be available to help those in need, having a knack for making people comfortable is needed in nearly every industry.

Career Options for People Who Love People

There are many jobs that involve working with the public or with a group of people. If you love people, then choosing a career means spending some time brainstorming and narrowing it down. To help you, look below for some great career options that involve working with people.

Job Title Median Salary (2016)* Job Growth (2014-2024)*
Customer Service Representative $32,300 10%
Emergency Dispatcher $38,870 -3%
Receptionist $27,920 10%
Marketing Manager $131,180 9%
Lawyer $118,160 6%
Dental Hygienist $72,910 19%
Physical Therapist $85,400 34%

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Career Information for People Who Love People

Customer Service Representative

Those who work in customer service must be willing to interact with people on a regular basis. They answer phone calls and emails all day and assist customers with a myriad of questions. They process orders and handle problems when customers have complaints. A customer service representative usually works at individual companies, agencies, banks, retail stores, or call centers. They usually need no college degree, but rather a high school diploma and on-the-job training.

Emergency Dispatcher

Dispatchers for police, ambulance, and fire emergencies are constantly on the phone to respond to emergency callers. They also handle non-emergency calls when citizens need less immediate assistance. They generally work in public safety answering points (PSAPs) and need skills like answering requests quickly and remaining calm. They need only a high school diploma and state certification, depending on state law.

Receptionist

Receptionists are the face of most companies. They answer phone calls, direct visitors, and answer questions all day long, perfect for someone who loves people. Pretty much every industry hires receptionists. If a business has an office, it is likely they have a receptionist: doctors, veterinarians, businesses, and so on. Receptionists must be good at communicating. No diploma is necessary except one from high school.

Marketing Manager

A marketing manager handles the financial aspect of marketing campaigns for clients. They analyze markets to determine where a client's products might sell well. They also help clients maximize profits by creating pricing strategies for future marketing and sales campaigns. People who love people would do well in this job because marketing managers must work closely with clients, and they must be able to read people well enough to predict product success. Many of these managers work for advertising agencies, but others are hired by specific companies to work in-office. They generally need at least a bachelor's in the field as well as some work experience.

Lawyer

Lawyers work closely with clients to advise them on legal issues. Lawyers can choose where they work, whether for a private firm, corporate firm or for the government. Because they interact with clients and colleagues on a regular basis, lawyers need to enjoy working with people. They usually need a law degree and to pass their state's bar exam in order to practice.

Dental Hygienist

A dental hygienist works with dental patients, making them comfortable in the dentist's chair and cleaning their teeth. They must look for signs of mouth disease and educate patients on how to care for their teeth. Dental hygienists work with people throughout the day, both coworkers and patients, so loving people is a good trait to have. They need an associate's degree in dental hygiene as well as licensing by the state.

Physical Therapist

As a rapidly growing occupation, physical therapists work with patients to determine what care is best for their injuries or pain. Their expertise is in creating a treatment plan that increases movement of the body and reduces pain and inflammation. They may work in nursing homes, in private offices, or at hospitals. Such constant exposure to others means that people who love people are a good fit for this job. Physical therapists need a doctoral degree in physical therapy as well as state licensing.

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