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Building Maintenance Technician Career Profile and Job Duties

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a building maintenance technician. Get a quick view of the educational requirements, job duties and certification options to find out if this is the career for you.

Building maintenance technicians are responsible for keeping buildings in proper working condition. They perform a wide range of tasks, such as painting, landscaping, and general maintenance. Technicians may be required to have prior related experience, a certificate, or an associate's degree.

Essential Information

A building maintenance technician performs a variety of duties as specified by an employer. Technicians maintain buildings, where their duties may include performing carpentry, pest control, painting, general upkeep and repair, landscaping and HVAC maintenance tasks. They can get formal training in specific areas or receive on-the-job training. Voluntary certifications are available to those who qualify. Licensing in plumbing, heating and air conditioning or other areas could improve job prospects.

Required Education Variable; on-the-job training or a certificate or associate's degree in an area such as HVAC repair or building maintenance technology
Projected Job Growth (2014-2024)* 6% (for all general maintenance and repair workers)
Median Salary (May 2015)* $36,630 (for all general maintenance and repair workers)

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Career Profile for Building Maintenance Technicians

Most employers look for workers who have several years of experience in construction and building maintenance. Requirements for employment vary from employer to employer, depending on the size of the company. Smaller employers seek building maintenance technicians with experience in construction, landscaping and finish-carpentry. Other firms, such as those that manage large real estate holdings, may seek a technician who has a degree in areas such as pest control or HVAC repair.

Building maintenance technicians looking to improve skills and marketability choose formal education or licensing in areas such as electrical work, plumbing, heating, air conditioning, landscaping and power systems. Technicians who earn certificates or degrees in building maintenance technology often find work in large facilities, such as universities, event venues and apartment complexes.

Maintenance technicians can earn voluntary certification with the Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals and become Certified Maintenance and Reliability Professionals. With certification, technicians may find it easier to advance in their career and attain new find jobs.

Job Duties

Building maintenance technicians complete a variety of maintenance and repair jobs, and typical duties can vary from day to day. One day they may remodel an office, and the next they may be working on the building's electrical system. Some technicians take care of landscaping and do basic janitorial work. They should be proficient in plastering, dry wall installation and painting.

A building maintenance technician may be required to order supplies and work within a budget. Technicians may be responsible for inventory control and assisting the building manager with developing a budget. The technician may also hire, train and supervise other employees.

Knowledge of swimming pools, pool filtration systems and ozone systems is necessary as they will need to test the pool's water and add chemicals as needed. The technician may be required to maintain fitness equipment, such as treadmills, weight machines and stair-steppers. They often keep maintenance schedules and records and are often required to maintain material safety data sheets.

In addition, technicians may be required to perform safety checks throughout the facility. He or she might be responsible for maintaining warranties on equipment and performing preventative maintenance.

Building maintenance technicians perform many technical tasks in order to keep buildings functioning properly. Their responsibilities may include preventative maintenance, dry wall installation, HVAC maintenance, and even carpentry. Some employers require experience in construction and a related certificate or associate's degree.

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