Audiology and Hearing Sciences

The fields of audiology and hearing sciences are concerned with the assessment and prevention of different types of hearing disorders. Completion of a doctoral program is usually required in order to work as an audiologist. Keep reading to learn more.

Inside Audiology and Hearing Sciences

According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), audiologists are health professionals proficient in non-medical management of the body's auditory and balance systems (www.asha.org). Audiology practitioners often work with medical specialists or other professionals to evaluate and treat hearing disorders. Among other tasks, audiologists will also dispense hearing aids and other types of hearing assistive technology systems. The following resources from Study.com can help you discover academic and career options for this field if you're interested in finding out more.

Education Information

Audiology and hearing sciences degree programs prepare students for careers in hearing therapy or other, similar fields. Degrees at the associate's level open the doorway to working as an audiology assistant. Bachelor's programs often explore topics related to both audiology and speech-language pathology. Common coursework might include speech and hearing disorders, the auditory system, bioacoustics and language development techniques.

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