Orthopedic Assistant School and College Program Overviews

Certificates in Orthopedic Technology prepare students for a career as an orthopedic assistant. These programs typically provide education orthopedic techniques and anatomy and physiology.

Essential Information

Orthopedic assistants are commonly referred to as orthopedic technicians or orthopedic technologists. Students who aspire to become orthopedic assistants should earn a certificate or associate's degree in orthopedic technology, although they might also enroll in programs that are designed for physical therapy assistants.

  • Prerequisites: High school diploma or GED.
  • Program Length: 1-2 years depending on the program.
  • Other Requirements: Practical experience or an internship may be required.

Certificate for Orthopedic Assistants

Some technical and community colleges offer programs leading to a certificate in orthopedic technology. A certificate program in orthopedic technology prepares students to perform routine procedures and assist orthopedic surgeons. This assistance generally includes applying casts and splints as well as assisting orthopedic physicians in surgeries.

An orthopedic assistant works under the supervision of an orthopedic surgeon to provide rehabilitative services to patients who have physical disabilities. The curriculum for an orthopedic assistant certificate program combines science and medical courses with classes that concentrate on orthopedic topics. Program coursework may include:

  • Orthopedic techniques and technology
  • Orthopedic radiology
  • Medical terminology
  • Anatomy and physiology

Some certificate programs might include a clinical practice in addition to classroom instruction.


Associate's Degree for Orthopedic Assistants

A 2-year degree in orthopedic technology prepares students for surgical and non-surgical careers in the orthopedic field. Career areas include sports medicine, in- or out-patient hospital care and emergency orthopedic care. An associate's degree also qualifies graduates to take the certification exam through the National Board of Certified Orthopedic Technologists. Prerequisites often include a GED or high school diploma as well as qualifying SAT or ACT scores.

Many of the courses contained in an associate's degree program in orthopedic technology are the same, or at least similar to, those found in a certificate program. In many cases, however, the courses in an associate's degree program will be more advanced. Some courses that one might expect to take in this program include:

  • Advanced orthopedic physiology and anatomy
  • Orthopedic surgical techniques
  • Orthopedic anatomy and physiology
  • Introduction to health care
  • Introduction to microcomputers
  • Biology

As in certificate programs, a practicum or internship in orthopedic technology is part of the associate's degree curriculum.


Popular Career Options

Those holding a certificate in orthopedic technology could be prepared to work as orthopedic assistants in:

  • Hospitals
  • Private orthopedic surgeon practices
  • Home health care centers
  • Residential care facilities
  • Physical therapy centers

Salary Info and Employment Outlook

No information about the employment outlook specifically for orthopedic assistants is currently available. The most closely related field is that of physical therapy assistants, and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), www.bls.org, reported job growth in that field was projected to be 41% between 2012 and 2022. The BLS additionally listed the average hourly pay rate for physical therapy assistants as $26.12 in 2014.

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