Professional Typist Professions Video: Career Options in Typing

Professional Typist Professions Video: Career Options in Typing Transcript

For those interested in a typing career, a position such as a secretary, administrative assistant, court reporter or stenographer may be appealing. All of these professions deal with typing and can be found within a variety of industries. Read on to find specific information on how to pursue a career in typing.


There are many positions that deal with typing on a daily basis. If you are interested in a career in typing, you may wish to check out professions like court reporter, secretary, stenographer or administrative assistant. All of these careers require accuracy and attention to detail. They also require one to be well-versed in basic computer skills and typing skills.

Job Duties and Skills

Depending on the position, the job duties and skills of a professional in the typing industry can vary. Court reporters, for example, are in charge of creating transcripts of conversations, legal hearings and proceedings or speeches. When it comes to typing skills, these professionals must have the know-how to use a stenotype machine. They also need to have accurate typing and listening skills.

A position as a secretary, another common option in the field of typing, involves creating documents using word processing software, taking notes, and constructing letters or memos. Being able to multi-task and follow instructions with set deadlines is essential. Administrative assistants, though very similar to secretaries, take typing skills to the next level. They are often charged with creating spreadsheets and presentations or even using desktop publishing software and graphics. Both secretaries and administrative assistants need to be well organized since they are often in charge of maintaining the functionality of the office they work in.

All professionals in the typing industry should have great oral communication skills along with the correct knowledge of grammar, punctuation, spelling and word processing. Speed and accuracy in typing is also a must.

Training Required

There is no set requirement for training and education for general secretaries or administrative assistants. Specialized positions, such as stenographer or medical secretary, usually do require some type of certification or training. For example, to become a real-time stenographer, students usually take up to 33 months of training in a technical or community college program. There are even programs that are certified by the National Court Reporters Association. Students who complete these programs should type a minimum of 225 words per minute. This is also the requirement for those wishing to be employed by the federal government.

Medical and legal secretaries can find similar training programs that prepare them for dealing with the language and terminology of the industry. Secretaries and administrative assistants quite often are able to find placement out of high school or may choose to enroll in a one to two year program at a technical college. Other certification organizations for those in the typing field include the International Association of Administrative Professionals, Legal Secretaries International Inc. and the National Association of Legal Secretaries.

Career Opportunities

There are many career opportunities for typing professionals. Positions, such as secretary, administrative assistant, executive assistant, stenographer, medical secretary or legal secretary are just a few of the options. These positions can be found within small and large businesses, nonprofit organizations, government entities or medical organizations. Professionals in this field typically work regular daytime hours, with occasional nights or weekends in the case of a special event or need.


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