A constant force is applied to an object, causing the object to accelerate at 10 m/s2. What will...

Question:

A constant force is applied to an object, causing the object to accelerate at 10 m/s{eq}^2 {/eq}. What will the acceleration be if the object's mass is doubled?

Newton's second law of motion

According to newton's second law of motion, the force applied on a body is directly proportional to the rate of change of momentum of the body with time.

An alternate statement for the law is, the force applied on a body is equal to the product of mass of the body and the acceleration produced in body.

Answer and Explanation:

Let the initial mass of object be m' , and the force applied be F.

Initial acceleration a' = {eq}10\ m/s^2 {/eq}

From newton's second law of motion,

F = m' * a' (Eqn1)

New mass m = 2m'

Let new acceleration be a".

Applying newton's second law again, we have

F = m" * a" ( Eqn2)

Comparing eqn 1 and eqn 2, we have

m' * a' = m" * a"

So, {eq}a" = \frac{a'}{2} = 5\ m/s^2 {/eq}


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Newton's Laws of Force & Motion

from GED Science: Life, Physical and Chemical

Chapter 7 / Lesson 6
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