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A fireworks shell is accelerated from rest to a velocity of 65.0 m/s over a distance of 0.250 m....

Question:

A fireworks shell is accelerated from rest to a velocity of 65.0 m/s over a distance of 0.250 m.

a) How long did the acceleration last?

b) Calculate the acceleration.

Motion with Uniform Acceleration

Uniformly accelerated motion is a motion in which acceleration remains constant. Kinematics equations for such a motion are, {eq}x = \dfrac{(v_f +v_i)t}{2} \\ v_f = v_i + at {/eq}, where

  • {eq}x {/eq} is the displacement of the object.
  • {eq}v_i {/eq} is the initial velocity of the object
  • {eq}v_f {/eq} is the final velocity of the object
  • a is the acceleration of the object
  • t is the time interval of the motion.

Answer and Explanation: 1

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Given :

The initial velocity of the shell is, {eq}v_i = 0 {/eq}

The initial velocity of the shell is, {eq}v_f = 65 \ m/s {/eq}

The displacement...

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Five Kinematics Quantities & the Big 5 Equations

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Chapter 7 / Lesson 3
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Kinematic quantities are calculated using the 'big 5' equations that explain a motion in constant acceleration, when in a straight line. Learn each of these variables and how they fit into example calculations provided.


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