During low intensity, long-duration exercise (long-distance running, for example), fatigue is NOT...

Question:

During low intensity, long-duration exercise (long-distance running, for example), fatigue is NOT believed to be caused by:

A. The declining levels of muscle glycogen and blood glucose levels.

B. The loss of extracellular electrolytes through sweating.

C. The partial fatigue of neurons within the Cerebrum.

D. The decrease in interstitial temperature observed in active muscle fibers.

Overheating

Overheating during exercise develops as water and electrolytes are lost through sweating. The mildest form, heat cramps, can lead to abdominal, leg, and arm cramps. As activity continues an athlete's condition can deteriorate further, and heat exhaustion can develop. Sweating continues to act as a cooling mechanism along with a rapid pulse and a rise in body temperature as high as 104 degrees Fahrenheit in this condition. Immediate cooling and rehydration with fluids containing electrolytes is essential. Heat stroke is the most serious of the heat conditions. In this case, sweating has stopped and body temperature is more than 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Heat stroke victims need immediate medical attention or risk damage to vital organs and death.

Answer and Explanation:

The correct answer is D. The decrease in interstitial temperature observed in active muscle fibers.

Explanation: the opposite is true. Active muscles give off heat, and the interstitial temperature will increase, not decrease, during exercise. The body's cooling mechanisms of sweating and vasodilation will need to kick in to help dissipate the heat given off by the muscles in order to prevent overheating which can lead to serious heat-related conditions. All of the other responses can cause fatigue.

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