How does a tobacco mosaic virus compare in size to a bacterium?

Question:

How does a tobacco mosaic virus compare in size to a bacterium?

Tobacco Mosaic Virus

The tobacco mosaic virus is a virus with a genome made of single-stranded RNA. It mainly infects plants in the family Solanaceae, including tobacco, and causes a mosaic-like pattern of discoloration to appear on the host plant's leaves.

Answer and Explanation:

Like all viruses, the tobacco mosaic virus is smaller than the average bacterium. The tobacco mosaic virus is only about 300 nanometers long with a diameter of about 18 nanometers. In contrast, most bacterial cells are between 500 and 5000 nanometers in length. However, the smallest known bacterial species, Mycoplasma genitalium, is only 200 to 300 nanometers in diameter.


Learn more about this topic:

Loading...
Tobacco Mosaic Virus: Structure and Function

from High School Biology: Help and Review

Chapter 19 / Lesson 16
22K

Related to this Question

Explore our homework questions and answers library