How does pyruvic acid in the cytoplasm move into the mitochondria?

Question:

How does pyruvic acid in the cytoplasm move into the mitochondria?

Answer and Explanation:

The transport of pyruvic acid into the mitochondria is accomplished by a transport protein (a protein that moves other materials within an organism) called pyruvate translocase. Pyruvate translocase transports pyruvate by use of a symporter - an integral membrane protein used in the transport of molecules across the cell membrane. Energy is required to accomplish this transport.

Once in the mitochondria, pyruvic acid is then oxidized by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex resulting in the formation of acetyl CoA. Acetyl CoA is the starting material for the Citric Acid Cycle, a key component of cellular respiration.


Learn more about this topic:

Pyruvate in Cellular Respiration

from General Studies Biology: Help & Review

Chapter 9 / Lesson 4
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