If a current is the result of the flow of electrons, then why doesn't wire get thin at one end...

Question:

If a current is the result of the flow of electrons, then why doesn't wire get thin at one end and thicker at the other?

Electric Current

An electric current or just simply current, is a net flow of current in a wire or a conductor for example. The amount of current depends on the amount of electron flowing and it is inversely proportional to the resistance of a wire or circuit.

Answer and Explanation:


First thing is that the wire is made up of matter or to put simply, atoms.


Atom is made up of electron, protons, neutrons, etc. and usually its mass is mainly from protons and neutrons or inside the nucleus.


Electrons are orbiting around the nucleus and furthest electron from the nucleus usually travels or transfer into the other atoms.


So, when there's a flow of electron or current in a wire, electrons are migrating in a similar direction and transfer from one end of the wire into the other end.


It doesn't mean a transfer of mass and making the wire thicker or thinner at one end, electrons are so small even when they're millions of them concentrated at one end, it doesn't change the geometry or shape of the wire.


Learn more about this topic:

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What is Electric Current? - Definition, Unit & Types

from CLEP Natural Sciences: Study Guide & Test Prep

Chapter 6 / Lesson 7
306K

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