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If life began on Earth 3.8 billion years ago from chemical reactions in a primordial soup, why...

Question:

If life began on Earth 3.8 billion years ago from chemical reactions in a primordial soup, why don't we observe this process repeating itself over again naturally or in a laboratory?

First Life on Earth:

Life is thought to have begun millions of years ago deep in the ocean near volcanic vents. The first life was a single-celled prokaryote. Over the course of billions of years, it evolved into more complex and multicellular life.

Answer and Explanation:

The first life began in extreme conditions. The Earth was a very different place then compared to how it is now. There was very little oxygen available. The Earth went through an ice age when it was essentially entirely frozen right after the first life appeared. So, conditions on Earth now are much different than when they were 3.8 billion years ago.

Another important point to mention here is that Urey and Miller did actually recreate those conditions in their lab and tested to see if they could create cells. Over time they were able to create 20 amino acids from their experiment. This means that DNA and RNA could be produced as well. So, although hard to replicate the conditions on Earth then; when scientists did attempt to do it, they were able to derive 20 amino acids from the experiment.


Learn more about this topic:

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The Origin of Life on Earth: Theories and Explanations

from Science 101: Intro to Natural Sciences

Chapter 15 / Lesson 1
190K

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