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If two opposite sides of a rectangle increase in length, how must the other two opposite sides...

Question:

If two opposite sides of a rectangle increase in length, how must the other two opposite sides change if the area of the rectangle is to remain constant?

Rectangles-Definition, Area, and Properties :

In the two dimensional geometry, a rectangle is a closed geometrical shape with four sides such that angle at each of the four vertices is a right angle also each side is parallel to the opposite side and have the identical length.

A rectangle has two diagonals of the identical length and the diagonal length of the rectangle is calculated by utilizing the Pythagorean theorem-

$$D^{2} = l^{2}+w^{2} $$

here $$D $$ is the length of the rectangle

{eq}l {/eq} is the length of the rectangle and {eq}w {/eq} is the width of the rectangle

Area of the Rectangle

$$A = l \times w $$

where A is the area of the rectangle in square units

Answer and Explanation:

Let the length and width of the rectangle be {eq}l {/eq} and {eq}w. {/eq}

$$A = l \times w --------------(1) $$

Also given that if two opposite sides of a rectangle increase in length.

Let the length of the rectangle is increased n times.

$$l' = n l $$

For the same area -

$$A = (l')(w') $$

$$A = (nl) (w') $$

from the equation(1)-

$$l( w) = n l (w') $$

$$w' = \frac{w}{n} $$

So the width of the rectangle is {eq}\displaystyle \frac{1}{n} {/eq} times the old width for the area of the rectangle is to remain constant.


Learn more about this topic:

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Measuring the Area of a Rectangle: Formula & Examples

from Geometry: High School

Chapter 8 / Lesson 7
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