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In a gasoline engine, fuel vapors are ignited by a spark. In a diesel engine, a fuel-air mixture...

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In a gasoline engine, fuel vapors are ignited by a spark. In a diesel engine, a fuel-air mixture is drawn in, then rapidly compressed to as little as 1/20 the original volume, in the process increasing the temperature enough to ignite the fuel-air mixture. Part A) Explain why the temperature rises during the compression.

Statement on gasoline engine temperature rises during compression :

We are not really talking about any of the usual gas laws (Boyle's law, Charles's law, ideal gas equation, etc).

Answer and Explanation:

We are not really talking about any of the usual gas laws (Boyle's law, Charles's law, ideal gas equation, etc).

The temperature rises during the...

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The Ideal Gas Law and the Gas Constant

from Chemistry 101: General Chemistry

Chapter 7 / Lesson 11
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