In systems biology, what is the difference between whole-cell simulations and metabolic models?

Question:

In systems biology, what is the difference between whole-cell simulations and metabolic models?

Systems biology:

Systems biology is a relatively new branch of biology that uses mathematical models to describe and study systems. It involves the analysis of large datasets, leading to simulations of system behavior. Systems biology tries to understand the whole picture of how different networks/pathways interact with a particular system.

Systems biology integrates different types of data, including genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics among others, and can provide new insights into biological systems.

Answer and Explanation:

Whole-cell simulations involve the prediction of phenotype from genotype, taking the contribution of every gene into account to describe and predict the structure and functioning of the cell. Such simulations act as frameworks for interpreting and incorporating experimental data.

Metabolic models, on the other hand, deal specifically with the description of metabolic pathways. These pathways are extremely complex and involve a very large number of interconnected reactions. Mathematical modeling is required to describe these in whole. There are two types of metabolic models: kinetic models and genome-scale metabolic models.


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Why Scientists Use Models & Simulations

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